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Covid-19, the Corona Virus, news of the epidemic, infection, control and spread

as we receive it at PHN.

Covid -19

Primary Health Net publish all data and information received on one page as we receive it.

As of most Opchat and PHN pages all are archived so we will be adding news stories to this page in the order received. There might be some duplication with our Opchat News but it will remain on this page to be referenced. Case numbers each day plus county variations are shown further down the page.



Three recent changes from August 2020 onwards reflecting the application of the brakes on lockdown easing.
Find out all you need to know about the new job retention scheme
Membership Organisations and Colleges combine to release Workforce Risk Assessment
Leicestershire coronavirus lockdown: areas and changes
New saliva test for coronavirus piloted in Southampton
World first coronavirus treatment approved for NHS use by government
Whole home testing rolled out to all care homes in England
As Government imposes compulsory face masks and PPE for every worker in hospitals, they announce new PPE UK deals
Government launches NHS Test and Trace service
Local Authority test and trace support announced.
Government to offer antibody tests to health and social care staff and patients in England
Government begins large scale study of coronavirus immunity
Coronavirus: UK furlough scheme extended to October with part-time work allowed
The public is advised to consider wearing face coverings in enclosed public spaces such as shops, trains and buses to help reduce the spread of coronavirus.
Government launches new portal for care homes to arrange coronavirus testing
Coronavirus test, track and trace plan launched on Isle of Wight
Coronavirus testing extended to all essential workers in England who have symptoms
Live Webinars available as tutorials for understanding CJRS payments, but limited so hurry.
Prepare to make a claim through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.
Coronavirus (COVID-19): personal protective equipment (PPE) hub
Further Updated Details from HMRC with links
Health Secretary sets out plan to carry out 100,000 coronavirus tests a day
Self-employment Income Support Scheme
Financial support for people and businesses
Routine Eyecare by Optical Practices ordered to cease on March 23rd in Scotland
Key Workers
New indemnity scheme for historical clinical negligence claims
New guidance to stay at home for 14 days if someone in your household has symptoms
What to do if you have symptoms?
Daily Government report on testing and loss of life


 


Three recent changes from August 2020 onwards reflecting the application of the brakes on lockdown easing.


August 1st

Read PHN's story on rolling day rate infections in the UK here

New rules on gatherings in some parts of Northern England

The Health Secretary Matt Hancock has this weekend announced that new rules on social gatherings will be introduced in Northern England to stop the spread of COVID-19.

These changes will also apply in Leicester city.

This is in response to an increasing trend in the number of cases per 100,000 people in the area, and data from Public Health England (PHE) and the Joint Biosecurity Centre (JBC) which suggests transmission among households is a key infection pathway in the area.

The areas that these changes apply to are:
The Greater Manchester area
Pendle
Hyndburn
Burnley
Rossendale
Blackburn with Darwen
Bradford
Calderdale
Kirklees
Leicester City

It means people in these areas will not be permitted to mix with other households (apart from those in their support bubbles) in private homes or gardens.

Some exemptions will be put in place, including for the vulnerable.

The government will sign new regulations to make these changes legally enforceable.

The regulations will give local authorities and police forces the powers to enforce these restrictions and more details on these will be set out when the regulations are published.

Households may go to hospitality, for instance bars and pubs, but new guidance will make clear that two households should not go to hospitality together.

Meanwhile local leaders and government have today agreed a number of changes to local restrictions in other areas.

While social gathering restrictions remain in place in Leicester City, the area will benefit from the lifting of restrictions that took place on 4 July in England, and all local restrictions currently in place in the neighbouring borough of Oadby and Wigston will end.

It means from Monday 3 August restaurants, cafes, bars and hairdressers in Leicester City can get back to business but leisure centres, gyms and pools will remain closed. In addition, cinemas and museums will open and religious ceremonies will be able to take place.

And on Saturday 1 August, Luton will be brought in line with the rest of the country after significant progress has been made in controlling the virus.

Health and care workers to self-isolate on return to England from high-risk countries

The move brings them in line with the general public and further protects the NHS and social care system from the spread of coronavirus from overseas, as signs of second waves begin to show in other countries.

Following review of whether the measure is still necessary, an exemption has been removed to minimise the risk of onward chains of transmission that might infect the wider workforce.

An exemption was originally put in place, at the beginning of June, which meant registered health and care professionals did not have to self-isolate when travelling to England from overseas.

This was to help ensure health and care workers travelling back from overseas could return to the England to provide essential healthcare, helping to strengthen the country’s response to the coronavirus outbreak and save lives.

Following the reopening of travel routes, and as more people begin to holiday abroad, the government has removed this exemption and, from 31 July, all registered health and care professionals must lawfully self-isolate when returning to England from a high-risk country.

The current list of countries exempt from self-isolation measures is available on GOV.UK. The data for all countries and territories is kept under constant review, and the exemptions list is updated with any changes on a regular basis as and when required to reflect the shifting international health picture.

Health and care professionals returning from a country which has a travel corridor to the UK will not be required to self-isolate on return.

This amendment to the regulations will ensure consistency with wider self-isolation measures and continue to protect public health.

Updates to the shielding programme on national and regional levels

From Saturday 1 August, shielding guidance for the clinically extremely vulnerable will be paused across England.

This means those who have been shielding over the course of the pandemic will no longer be advised to do so, and can begin to go back to work and school as long as the sites are COVID-secure.

People will also be able to go outside as much as they like, and visit supermarkets, pubs and shops, with social distancing guidelines still strongly advised.

The latest scientific evidence shows that the average incidence across the country remains lower now than the point when the decision was made to proceed with the pausing of shielding nationally. This has allowed for the relaxation of the guidance.

However, the easing of restrictions will not apply for those currently shielding in:

Blackburn with Darwen
Blaby and Charnwood
Luton
Leicester City
Wigston
Oadby

The government has written out to those living in these areas who are affected setting out the advice that applies locally.


Find out all you need to know about the new job retention scheme

July 22nd

Do you want to find out more about changes to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and how flexible furloughing can support your business? Join our live webinar, Extension to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and flexible furloughing, for the latest information, including:

• an overview of changes to the scheme, including how you can now bring previously furloughed employees back to work to suit the needs of your business

• an introduction to flexible furloughing and how it works

• examples of how to work out the wages of flexibly furloughed employees

• information on key dates and claims periods

• an overview of upcoming changes to the scheme in August, September and October as the level of the grant is slowly reduced and employers will be asked to contribute towards the cost of furloughed employees’ wages.

If you would like to join, please choose a date and time.

We've also added more dates for the live webinar which explains how to use the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Statutory Sick Pay Rebate Scheme, and gives you the latest information on:

• who can claim

• who you can claim for

• how to make a claim

• what you may be entitled to.

If you would like to join,choose a date and time.

We update our webinars regularly to reflect the latest government guidance and keep you fully informed of changes as they develop.

Membership Organisations and Colleges combine to release Workforce Risk Assessment

July 9th

Interim guidance – workforce risk assessment in primary eye care

1. Background

Employers and self-employed people must assess the health and safety risks at work. This includes an assessment of risk related to Covid-19 infection. Some people are more at risk of contracting and experiencing adverse outcomes of Covid-19 than others and it is important to perform a workforce risk assessment in addition to your workplace risk assessment.

This interim guidance note is based on the evidence of workforce risk available at the time of publication and will be reviewed and updated as more evidence becomes available.

For employers

This guidance is designed to supplement existing Covid-19 guidance. It provides additional background information on performing a workforce risk assessment, drawing on pan UK guidance from the four UK governments, NHS departments and occupational health.

This guidance is intended to support your workplace assessment and infection prevention and control (IPC) measures. For example, the following practice level risk management strategies will help reduce risk for all staff, patients and visitors while at the practice:

• all staff should self-screen for Covid-19 each day before leaving for work
• all staff should follow and comply with IPC measures, including standard precautions and the correct use of PPE
• people with a suspected or confirmed case of Covid-19 should not be seen in primary eye care settings – e.g. by triaging patients according to local protocols and directing them to appropriate local services
• the latest guidance on performing aerosol generating procedures (AGPs)in primary eye care settings should be followed.

These and other safe systems measures help reduce the risk of virus transmission for all groups, but you will also need to keep up to date with the emerging evidence for at risk groups and assess whether additional adjustments are required for individual staff members.

For practice owners, directors and self-employed practitioners

If you are a practice owner, director or self-employed, you should undertake a self-assessment.

If you work in multiple settings, consider whether the risk you are exposed to varies as you may need to repeat your self-assessment accordingly. Your workplace will also have a risk assessment and you should support and comply with local policies to help reduce the risk of virus transmission.

For employees

This guidance provides information on workforce risk assessments during the Covid-19 pandemic and highlights what you should expect your employer to do – i.e. both to assess and manage risk generally and for you as an individual.

Employers can perform risk assessments in different ways. In this guidance we suggest all employees are offered a risk assessment. You may find that undertaking a self-assessment of your risk first is a helpful preparation for discussions with your employer.

2. Workforce risk assessment

The Faculty of Occupational Medicine (FOM) advises employers to perform a workforce assessment, so that you can “identify those individuals with potentially increased vulnerability to infection or adverse outcomes from Covid-19”. FOM lists five main factors to consider:

Workforce risl assessment

The reasons why these factors increase risk are not yet fully understood, however the impact of Covid-19 may replicate existing health inequalities and, in some cases, exacerbate them further, particularly for BAME groups .

It is important to remember that local risk assessments do not replace official guidance about clinically extremely vulnerable and vulnerable groups to Covid-19 and how to adapt working arrangements for these groups. For example, this includes but is not limited to:

• clinically extremely vulnerable individuals should not work outside the home at this stage of the pandemic
• at this stage of the pandemic clinically vulnerable individuals should be helped to work from home, either in their current role or in an alternative role or otherwise prioritised for jobs where they can maintain social distancing
• Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists guidance for employers and pregnant women during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Although official lists of at-risk groups include health conditions, age and pregnancy, they do not cover sex or ethnicity. You should ensure you are up-to-date with emerging evidence on these risk factors from reliable sources, such as the FOM, and adapt your risk assessment as needed.

This guidance note will be updated when significant new evidence becomes available on both risk factors and risk management.

In all cases it is important to respect an individual’s confidentiality and not to make any assumptions based on appearance, partial information, history or a protected characteristic. For example, from an employment law perspective it is important to ensure that no one is treated less favourably on grounds of their race or that a provision, criterion or practice is not put in place which puts those in this group at a disadvantage. The shared goal here is to protect staff, so this should not become an issue. It is nevertheless important to encourage open feedback to ensure measures put in place to protect staff have the optimal affect and do not inadvertently disadvantage anybody based on a protected characteristic.

Conducting a risk assessment

Although it can be difficult to engage in conversations about known and potential Covid-19 risks, it is important for employers to reduce barriers to raising and sharing concerns, especially linked to protected characteristics, and to make time for sensitive and responsive conversations.

At the same time, a balance does need to be struck, so that members of staff are not required to discuss any health or other conditions they choose not to discuss. If a staff member does not want to discuss their health condition they should not be forced to.

The goal is always to work collaboratively and openly so you can perform an effective risk assessment and make any necessary adjustments.

Finally, when making these assessments, you need to comply with your wider duties to those with protected characteristics. You can do this by asking all employees to review and complete a risk assessment form (see Section 4).

3. Actions to take following a risk assessment

During the pandemic, a workplace risk assessment should result in implementing rigorous infection prevention and control (IPC) measures, including the correct use of PPE and social distancing, for all employees in primary eye care settings.

The College of Optometrists advises that where appropriate PPE is not available, face-to-face care within 2m should be postponed or patients should be signposted as clinically necessary to an alternative provider with appropriate PPE.

Other risk reduction measures for all employees should include, but is not limited to:

• Limiting the duration of close interaction with patients by only conducting clinically necessary tests and examinations.
• Asking that the patient attends any face to face consultation unaccompanied where possible.

This means that, following an individual risk assessment you might find that no additional precautions are necessary. Where individuals are at greater risk, you might introduce further risk reduction measures, such as:

1. Redeploying staff at very high risk to activities that require less face to face contact with patients, for example:

i. Prioritising telemedicine and triage clinics for clinicians at very high risk.
ii. Encouraging remote working where possible.

2. Enabling staff at high risk to avoid the busiest times on public transport through adjustments to work hours.

3. Providing or signposting to additional support on topics such as wellbeing, chaplaincy/faith advice and counselling, as well as practical help where possible.

Workforce risk assessments should be reviewed whenever there are any significant changes, such as new guidance on at risk groups, work equipment, work activities, or a change in an individual’s personal circumstances.

We also recommend that you keep a record of the risk assessment and include example templates in Section 4 to support this. As the risk assessment includes reference to workers’ health conditions, it should be treated as sensitive information under data protection legislation (including GDPR) and managed appropriately.

All team members should be encouraged to inform their employer (such as their occupational health team or manager) if there are any changes to their health or circumstances that may affect the risk assessment.

4. Risk assessment templates

An example risk assessment template is included in Appendix 1. This is based on existing official extremely clinically vulnerable and clinically vulnerable criteria in the UK, but also includes other factors that might be considered. The template will be updated if official recommendations change. The template does not include a risk scoring mechanism as there is currently no robust, validated and peer-reviewed scoring mechanism for Covid-19 risk .

Appendix 2 includes links to other risk assessment tools that have been developed for various health and social care professions and risk assessment resources.

5. Covid-19 guidance

You should read this workforce risk assessment alongside Covid-19 guidance from your representative and professional bodies. We appreciate that implementing these measures might involve complex employment law and health and safety considerations. If you need additional support and advice:
FODO members can email hr@fodo.com or call 01244 688422.
College members can contact Clinical Advisors at adviser@college-optometrists.org..
AOP members can email employment@aop.org.uk
ABOD members can email general@abdo.org.uk

6. Share feedback on this guidance


The goal of this tool is to help assess risk and protect staff. If you have feedback on this interim guidance note or the template risk assessment tool in Appendix 1, please share it with us by leaving feedback here.

Appendix 1: Confidential Covid-19 Personnel Risk Assessment

The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 require employers to carry out a risk assessment to assess your work and working environment so that you are not placed at risk at work including during the coronavirus pandemic.

Your co-operation in completing this form is appreciated. The form is for health and safety purposes only. The information will be treated as confidential and used to ensure that any potential hazards to which you are exposed are evaluated and managed.

Employers and employees might be interested in an objective scoring model that has been developed and submitted for peer-review.  Although still pending peer-review, it provides a suggested objective risk stratification tool for people not already on official clinically vulnerable and extremely vulnerable lists in the UK.

Information taken from the latest UK wide government guidance as of 6 July 2020 .

Name:..................................................................................
Position: ..............................................................................
Location: .............................................................................

Coronavirus (Covid-19) can make anyone seriously ill. But for some people, the risk is higher. This table is designed to help us better understand your individual risk so that we can work with you to find ways to manage any risk while at work.

rISK TABLE 2
rISK TABLE 2
rISK TABLE 2
rISK TABLE 2


Notes: enter text HERE .

Employee signed:
Date: enter a date.

Line manager signed:
Date: enter a date.

Updates: enter a date.
enter text.

enter a date.
enter text.

Appendix 2: Risk assessment tools and resources

The British Medical Association (BMA) has now endorsed this Covid-19 risk assessment tool which includes a self-scoring assessment tool.

Faculty of Occupational Medicine Risk Reduction Framework for NHS staff at risk of COVID-19 infection.


All Wales COVID-19Workforce Risk Assessment Tool [https://gov.wales/written-statement-all-wales-covid-19-workforce-risk-assessment-tool]. The tool is a work in progress and will be improved and developed based on feedback from employers and employees using it.
RCN Position on Employer Responsibilities for BAME staff: https://www.rcn.org.uk/covid-19/rcn-position/bame-staff-employer-responsibilities
NHS Employers guidance: https://www.nhsemployers.org/covid19/health-safety-and-wellbeing/risk-assessments-for-staff
NHS trade unions principles for risk assessment: https://www.nhsemployers.org/-/media/Employers/Documents/COVID19/NHS-Trade-union-principles-on-health-and-safety-risk-assessment-and-vulnerable-workers.pdf?la=en&hash=368CC229252B4C7F736DB2B5F21611B62931E2F6

Royal College of Psychiatrists COVID-19 Guidance on risk mitigation for BAME staff in mental healthcare settings: https://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/about-us/responding-to-covid-19/responding-to-covid-19-guidance-for-clinicians/risk-mitigation-for-bame-staff

Guys & St Thomas’ resources

In addition, the Health and Safety Executive has information about managing risks and risk assessment at work, which includes templates https://www.hse.gov.uk/simple-health-safety/risk/index.htm.


Leicestershire coronavirus lockdown: areas and changes

July 1st


Areas of Leicestershire that are included in the localised coronavirus (COVID-19) lockdown and what this means.On 29 June, the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care Matt Hancock set out the local action being taken in Leicester following a surge in coronavirus cases in the area.

This morning, the local councils set out the following areas of Leicestershire that are included in the localised lockdown:
in Blaby District:

Braunstone Town (including Fosse Park)
Glenfield
Glen Parva
Leicester Forest East (east of the M1)
Thorpe Astley
in Charnwood:
Birstall
Thurmaston
all areas of Oadby and Wigston



Changes in the Leicester areaLeicestershire Lockdown Map

Within this boundary, restrictions will be put in place pending a review from 18 July.

This means:

non-essential shops that reopened on 15 June have been asked to close from today (30 June)
bars, restaurants and hairdressers will not reopen on 4 July
schools will close from Thursday 2 July except to vulnerable children and children of key workers. They will not reopen until next term
the relaxation of shielding measures due on 6 July cannot now take place in Leicester
single-adult households (those who live alone or with dependent children only) can still form a support bubble with one other household
people are still able to meet in a group of up to 6 and only outdoors, provided strict social distancing is followed
people in Leicester are recommended to stay at home as much as they can
we advise against all but essential travel to, from and within Leicester

New saliva test for coronavirus piloted in Southampton

June 22nd

A weekly coronavirus (COVID-19) testing model using a new ‘no-swab’ saliva test is to be piloted in Southampton from this week (22 June).

New coronavirus saliva test to be trialled in Southampton

Weekly tests can be completed by transferring saliva into a sample pot
Over 14,000 GP staff, other essential key workers and university staff and their households will participate in the first phase of the trial
Participants will be able to complete coronavirus tests at home by putting their saliva into a sample pot to be tested for current infections of the virus.
GP staff, other essential key workers, university employees and members of their households will be among the first groups to participate in the pilot, with test kits delivered either to their home or place of work for them to complete every week.

Samples will be collected safely from homes by University of Southampton staff or returned to an agreed location on a weekly basis and participants will receive test results within 48 hours.
Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock said: " Saliva testing could potentially make it even easier for people to take coronavirus tests at home, without having to use swabs. This trial will also help us learn if routine, at-home testing could pick up cases of the virus earlier. I am very grateful to everyone involved in the trial who is helping us develop our understanding of the virus which will benefit not only our but the global response to it.

The new saliva test will be significant to increasing testing capacity and accessibility as it does not require the use of a swab, which some people find uncomfortable. The test has already been shown to be highly promising and the pilot is undertaking further validation against polymerase chain reaction (PCR) nasal swabs.

Weekly testing as part of the pilot will help to identify coronavirus cases early on, including for those with no or minor symptoms, meaning those who test positive can isolate within their households. The details of those who test positive will be shared with the NHS Test and Trace programme so contact tracing can start immediately.

This comes on top of the routine testing of asymptomatic staff in health and care settings already taking place using existing testing capacity.

The pilot will be jointly led by Southampton City Council, the University of Southampton and the NHS, alongside a wider network of public services in Hampshire.

In addition to the new application of using saliva from Optigene being piloted in Southampton, we are currently exploring the potential of other no-swab saliva-based coronavirus tests with companies, including Chronomics, Avacta, MAP Science and Oxford Nanoimaging (ONI). We are also working with a number of suppliers, including DNA Genotek, International Scientific Supplies Ltd, Isohelix and other leading manufacturers, to develop bespoke saliva collection kits and scale up manufacturing for products that can be used with existing PCR tests.

World first coronavirus treatment approved for NHS use by government

June 2020

The government has immediately authorised the NHS to use the world’s first coronavirus treatment proven to reduce the risk of death.

Ground-breaking coronavirus treatment approved for use across the NHS from today

Government-funded UK trial showed drug saved lives by significantly reducing risk of death in hospitalised patients who require oxygen

Government ensures drug is available across all NHS healthcare settings and across the whole of the UK with immediate effect

Thousands of lives will be saved in the UK with the government immediately authorising the NHS to use the world’s first coronavirus treatment proven to reduce the risk of death.

Dexamethasone, an anti-inflammatory drug, has been immediately approved to treat all UK hospitalised COVID-19 patients requiring oxygen, including those on ventilators, from today.

Whole home testing rolled out to all care homes in England


June 6th

Every care home in England will now be offered a coronavirus test for all residents and staff, even if they have no symptoms.

Adult care homes for under-65s, including those with learning disabilities or mental health problems will be offered testing, regardless of whether residents have symptoms

New social care sector COVID-19 support taskforce set up to continue supporting the care sector and prevent further transmission

New taskforce to be headed up by newly appointed Chair, David Pearson CBE

The government is extending whole care home testing to all adult care homes after meeting the target of offering a test to every care home for over-65s and those with dementia in England by 6 June.

Since the launch of whole care home testing, the government has provided 1,071,103 test kits to 8,984 care homes, and we are now able to send out over 50,000 test kits a day.

As Government imposes compulsory face masks and PPE for every worker in hospitals, they announce new PPE UK deals

June 5th

New UK deals will bring millions more PPE items to frontline healthcare staff. Millions more visors, aprons and gowns will be delivered to frontline health and social care workers treating coronavirus patients, manufactured in response to the UK government’s call to arms.

Four more companies answer government’s call to arms to manufacture PPE Millions more visors, aprons and gowns to be delivered over the next few months

New contracts are part of the government’s ‘Make’ initiative to harness UK production power

As part of the government’s Make initiative to use the production power of the UK’s world-leading manufacturing sector, 4 new partnerships have been struck to rapidly produce and deliver PPE to frontline workers over the coming months.

Face masks and coverings to be worn by all NHS hospital staff and visitors

All staff in hospitals in England will be provided with surgical masks which they will be expected to wear from 15 June. All visitors and outpatients must wear face coverings at all times.

Evidence from the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) previously confirmed face coverings can help reduce the risk of transmission if you are suffering from coronavirus, but not showing symptoms.

NHS staff already wear face masks in clinical areas within 2 metres of a patient, but this new guidance applies to everyone working in all areas of the hospital.

Members of the public are strongly urged to attend hospital wearing a face covering, but a face mask will be provided in emergencies.

Government launches NHS Test and Trace service

May 2020

New guidance means those who have been in close contact with someone who tests positive must isolate for 14 days, even if they have no symptoms.
Published 27 May 2020

NHS Test and Trace service to form a central part of the government’s coronavirus recovery strategy

Anyone with symptoms will be tested and their close contacts will be traced

New guidance means those who have been in close contact with someone who tests positive must isolate for 14 days, even if they have no symptoms, to avoid unknowingly spreading the virus
The new NHS Test and Trace service will launch tomorrow (Thursday 28 May) across England, the government announced.

The service will help identify, contain and control coronavirus, reduce the spread of the virus and save lives.

From today, anyone who tests positive for coronavirus will be contacted by NHS Test and Trace and will need to share information about their recent interactions. This could include household members, people with whom they have been in direct contact, or within 2 metres for more than 15 minutes.

People identified as having been in close contact with someone who has a positive test must stay at home for 14 days, even if they do not have symptoms, to stop unknowingly spreading the virus.
If those in isolation develop symptoms, they can book a test at nhs.uk/coronavirus or by calling 119. If they test positive, they must continue to stay at home for 7 days or until their symptoms have passed. If they test negative, they must complete the 14-day isolation period.

Members of their household will not have to stay at home unless the person identified becomes symptomatic, at which point they must also self-isolate for 14 days to avoid unknowingly spreading the virus.

Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock said:" As we move to the next stage of our fight against coronavirus, we will be able to replace national lockdowns with individual isolation and, if necessary, local action where there are outbreaks. NHS Test and Trace will be vital to stopping the spread of the virus. It is how we will be able to protect our friends and family from infection, and protect our NHS.
This new system will help us keep this virus under control while carefully and safely lifting the lockdown nationally."

NHS Test and Trace brings together 4 tools to control the virus:

test: increasing availability and speed of testing will underpin NHS Test and Trace.

trace: when someone tests positive for coronavirus the NHS Test and Trace service will use dedicated contact tracing staff, online services and local public health experts to identify any close recent contacts they’ve had and alert those most at risk of having the virus who need to self-isolate. This will be complemented by the rollout of the NHS COVID-19 App in the coming weeks.

contain: a national Joint Biosecurity Centre will work with local authorities and public health teams in Public Health England (PHE), including local Directors of Public Health, to identify localised outbreaks and support effective local responses, including plans to quickly deploy testing facilities to particular locations. Local authorities have been supported by £300 million of new funding to help local authorities develop their own local outbreak control plans.

enable: government to learn more about the virus, including as the science develops, to explore how we could go further in easing infection control measures.

The NHS Test and Trace service, including 25,000 dedicated contact tracing staff working with Public Health England, will have the capacity to trace the contacts of 10,000 people who test positive for coronavirus per day and can be scaled up if needed.

The rollout of the NHS Test and Trace service has been made possible by the rapid expansion of testing. The largest network of diagnostic testing facilities in British history has been created and will soon have the capacity to carry out 200,000 tests a day. This includes 50 drive-through sites, more than 100 mobile testing units and 3 mega laboratories.

People who are contacted by the NHS Test and Trace service will be given clear information explaining what they must do and how they can access local support if needed. Guidance is also available online at gov.uk/coronavirus. This comes as the Department for Work and Pensions has announced that those having to self-isolate will be eligible for Statutory Sick Pay if they are unable to work from home. This applies across the 4 nations of the UK.

Dido Harding, Executive Chair of NHS Test and Trace, said:" This is a brand new service which has been launched at incredible speed and scale. NHS Test and Trace already employs over 40,000 people, both directly and through trusted partners, who are working hard to deliver both testing and contact tracing at scale. This is no small achievement and I am hugely grateful to everyone involved.
NHS Test and Trace will not succeed on its own – we all need to play our part. This is why we are working hand-in-hand with communities and local authorities across the country to tailor support at a local level, and respond quickly to local needs. And we will be constantly developing and improving as we go. Together we can help contain the virus, stop it spreading further and ultimately save lives."

The government has also today expanded testing availability for children aged under 5, to help support the phased opening of schools and childcare settings in England from 1 June. From tomorrow, all symptomatic individuals in England will be able to access a test if they need one, with all symptomatic individuals in Wales able to book tests from Saturday.

Anyone with a new, continuous cough, a high temperature or a change in their sense of smell or taste is asked to immediately report these symptoms and book a test at nhs.uk/coronavirus.

A package of £300 million of new funding has been made available to local authorities to work with NHS Test and Trace to develop local outbreak control plans, building on the work already done so far to respond to coronavirus. Their plans will focus on identifying and containing potential outbreaks in places such as workplaces, housing complexes, care homes and schools, ensuring testing capacity is deployed effectively and helping the most vulnerable in self-isolation access essential services in their area. A new Local Government Advisory Board has also been established to support this work.

Professor John Newton, National Coordinator of Test and Trace, said:" At this critical point in the nation’s response to coronavirus we are launching a service that will enable us to emerge more safely from lockdown. To control the virus we still need to continue with social distancing and good hygiene, but we also now have a comprehensive test and trace service to stop new cases spreading. This approach will allow us to gradually return to more normal personal, social and economic lives while recognising that we have to stay alert and respond rapidly to any advice from the new service."

Local Authority test and trace support announced.

May 2020

£300 million additional funding for local authorities to support new test and trace service

Local authorities will be central to supporting the new test and trace service in England, with the government providing a new funding package of £300 million.

Local authorities to work with government to support test and trace services in their local communities

£300 million will be provided to all local authorities in England to develop and action their plans to reduce the spread of the virus in their area. Work will build on the continued efforts of communities across the country to respond to the pandemic locally

Local authorities will be central to supporting the new test and trace service across England, with the government providing a new funding package of £300 million.

Each local authority will be given funding to develop tailored outbreak control plans, working with local NHS and other stakeholders.

Work on the plans will start immediately. Their plans will focus on identifying and containing potential outbreaks in places such as workplaces, housing complexes, care homes and schools.
As part of this work, local authorities will also need to ensure testing capacity is deployed effectively to high-risk locations. Local authorities will work closely with the test and trace service, local NHS and other partners to achieve this.

Data on the virus’s spread will be shared with local authorities through the Joint Biosecurity Centre to inform local outbreak planning, so teams understand how the virus is moving, working with national government where necessary to access the testing and tracing capabilities of the new service.

Local communities, organisations and individuals will also be encouraged to follow government guidance and assist those self-isolating in their area who need help. This will include encouraging neighbours to offer support and identifying and working with relevant community groups.

Government to offer antibody tests to health and social care staff and patients in England

May 2020

New antibody testing programme to provide tens of thousands of antibody tests per day across the UK from next week.

All NHS and care staff in England will be offered a test, with patients and care residents eligible at their clinician’s request

Accurate and reliable lab-based antibody tests will improve understanding and data on COVID-19

Devolved administrations will decide who is eligible for tests in their jurisdictions

Antibody tests will be available to NHS and care staff, eligible patients and care residents in England to see if they have had coronavirus as part of a new national antibody testing programme announced by Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock.

Tests will be prioritised for NHS and care staff, and clinicians will be able to request them for patients in both hospital and social care settings if they deem it appropriate.

The new antibody testing programme, which will start next week, follows the substantial expansion of the UK’s swab testing capacity, which saw the creation of the country’s biggest network of diagnostic labs completed in record time. Swab testing confirms whether or not someone currently has the virus that causes COVID-19.

Under the new programme announced today, highly accurate laboratory based antibody tests will be used to tell whether someone has already had the virus, to provide accurate data about the antibodies they have developed in response. The information will help clinicians and scientists to better understand the prevalence of the virus in different regions across the country.

Government begins large scale study of coronavirus immunity

May 18th

Antibody testing will help to understand levels of immunity and the role of genetics

Up to 20,000 people of all ages and walks of life to take part for at least 6 months

Up to 20,000 people are being asked to take part in a new government-funded study to further track the extent of the coronavirus spread across England, Scotland and Wales.
The research will measure blood antibodies to help determine what proportion of the population has already had the infection, the duration of immunity after being infected, and why the virus affects people differently.

Led by UK Biobank and supported by the Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC), the study, which was developed with the Wellcome Trust, also draws on the world-leading scientific expertise of the University of Oxford. It forms part of Pillar 4 of the Government’s COVID-19 testing strategy to conduct UK-wide surveillance testing to learn more about the spread of the virus.

In total, 20,000 thousand people will take part. The study participants will be chosen from existing, consented UK Biobank volunteers, as well as their adult children and grandchildren. This is the first time UK Biobank has opened up a research study to the next generation of participants, which will help to ensure that all regions, ages and socio-economic groups are represented .

Each month, participants will be asked to provide a sample of blood using a finger‐prick device, and to complete a short questionnaire about any relevant symptoms they may have experienced. The de-identified samples will be returned to UK Biobank for processing before being sent for validated antibody testing at the University of Oxford.

This information will help inform future Government strategy on the ongoing response to the virus, including lockdown and social distancing measures. The first results from initial participants are expected to be available in early June.

Secretary of State for Health and Social Care Matt Hancock said: " Our response to this pandemic is rightly guided by the science and based on the best available evidence - so I’m determined to do everything we can to learn more about coronavirus."

This UK Biobank study will build our understanding of the rate of COVID-19 infection in the general population and, importantly, it will add to our knowledge about the risk factors that mean the virus can affect individuals differently.

Alongside the ongoing ONS and Imperial College research, the results of this study will assist our virus modelling and inform future plans for managing the pandemic.

Established by the Wellcome Trust and the Medical Research Council, UK Biobank has been following the health of 500,000 UK participants over the last 10 years through detailed health records, genetic and lifestyle data. As a result, it is uniquely well-placed to investigate whether the immune response to coronavirus differs between people with different genetic backgrounds.

Coronavirus: UK furlough scheme extended to October with part-time work allowed

May 12th 2020

Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme will continue until end of October, furloughed workers across UK will continue to receive 80% of their current salary, up to £2,500
new flexibility will be introduced from August to get employees back to work and boost economy

In a boost to millions of jobs and businesses, Rishi Sunak said the furlough scheme would be extended by a further four months with workers continuing to receive 80% of their current salary.

As we reopen the economy, we need to support people to get back to work. From the start of August, furloughed workers will be able to return to work part-time with employers being asked to pay a percentage towards the salaries of their furloughed staff.

The employer payments will substitute the contribution the government is currently making, ensuring that staff continue to receive 80% of their salary, up to £2,500 a month.
Chancellor Rishi Sunak said: " Our Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme has protected millions of jobs and businesses across the UK during the outbreak – and I’ve been clear that I want to avoid a cliff edge and get people back to work in a measured way.
This extension and the changes we are making to the scheme will give flexibility to businesses while protecting the livelihoods of the British people and our future economic prospects."

New statistics published today revealed the job retention scheme has protected 7.5 million workers and almost 1 million businesses.

The scheme will continue in its current form until the end of July and the changes to allow more flexibility will come in from the start of August. More specific details and information around its implementation will be made available by the end of this month.

The government will explore ways through which furloughed workers who wish to do additional training or learn new skills are supported during this period. It will also continue to work closely with the Devolved
Administrations to ensure the scheme supports people across the Union.

The Chancellor’s decision to extend the scheme, which will continue to apply across all regions and sectors in the UK economy, comes after the government outlined its plan for the next phase of its response to the coronavirus outbreak.

The scheme is just one part of the government’s world-leading economic response to coronavirus, including an unprecedented package for the self-employed, loans and guarantees that have so far provided billions of pounds in support, tax deferrals and grants for small businesses.

Today the government is also publishing new statistics that show businesses have benefitted from over £14 billion in loans and guarantees to support their cashflow during the crisis. This includes 268,000 Bounce Back Loans worth £8.3 billion, 36,000 loans worth over £6 billion through the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, and £359 million through the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme.

Mike Cherry, National Chairman of the Federation of Small Businesses, said: " The Job Retention Scheme is a lifeline which has been hugely beneficial in helping small employers keep their staff in work, and it’s extension is welcome. Small employers have told us that part-time furloughing will help them recover from this crisis and it is welcome that new flexibility is announced today.

BCC Director General Adam Marshall said: " The extension of the Job Retention Scheme will come as a huge help and a huge relief for businesses across the UK.
The Chancellor is once again listening to what we’ve been saying, and the changes planned will help businesses bring their people back to work through the introduction of a part-time furlough scheme. We will engage with the Treasury and HMRC on the detail to ensure that this gives companies the flexibility they need to reopen safely.

Over the coming months, the government should continue to listen to business and evolve the scheme in line with what’s happening on the ground. Further support may yet be needed for companies who are unable to operate for an extended period, or those who face reduced capacity or demand due to ongoing restrictions."

Dame Carolyn Fairbairn, CBI Director-General, said: " The Chancellor is confronting a challenging balancing act deftly. As economic activity slowly speeds up, it’s essential that support schemes adapt in parallel.
Extending the furlough to avoid a June cliff-edge continues the significant efforts made already and will protect millions of jobs.
Introducing much needed flexibility is extremely welcome. It will prepare the ground for firms that are reawakening, while helping those who remain in hibernation. That’s essential as the UK economy revives step-by-step, while supporting livelihoods. Firms will, of course, want more detail on how they will contribute to the scheme in the future and will work with government to get this right.
Above all, the path of the virus is unpredictable, and much change still lies ahead. The government must continue to keep a watchful eye on those industries and employees that remain at risk. All schemes will need to be kept under review to help minimise impacts on people’s livelihoods and keep businesses thriving.
The greater the number of good businesses saved now, the easier it will be for the economy to recover."

The public is advised to consider wearing face coverings in enclosed public spaces such as shops, trains and buses to help reduce the spread of coronavirus.

May 2020

People who use public transport or visit shops should consider covering their mouth and nose based on advice from SAGE

Face coverings are not a replacement for social distancing and regular handwashing which remain the most important actions, says Chief Medical Officer

Public urged not to buy medical grade masks so they can be saved for frontline health and care workers, and instead make their own face coverings at home

The public is advised to consider wearing face coverings in enclosed public spaces where you may be more likely to come into contact with people you do not normally meet, the government announced today.
After careful consideration of the latest scientific evidence from the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE), the government confirmed face coverings can help reduce the risk of transmission in some circumstances.

Face coverings can help us protect each other and reduce the spread of the disease if you are suffering from coronavirus but not showing symptoms. People with coronavirus symptoms, as well as members of their household, should continue to follow the advice to self-isolate.

They may be beneficial in places where it is hard to follow maintain social distancing measures. This applies when using public transport, such as trains, buses and metro systems, or when visiting shops.

They do not need to be worn outdoors, while exercising, in schools, in workplaces such as offices and retail, by those who may find them difficult to wear, such as children under two or primary aged children who
cannot use them without assistance, or those who may have problems breathing while wearing a face covering.

The public is being strongly urged not to purchase surgical masks or respirators. These are prioritised for healthcare workers working in more high-risk environments where the risk is greatest.

Instead the public is encouraged to make face coverings at home, using scarves or other textile items that many will already own. Read the guidance on how to wear and make a cloth face covering.
Health Minister Jo Churchill said:" At all times our strategy for keeping the public and the NHS safe during this crisis has been guided by the science.
Today, thanks to the evidence provided by our expert scientists, we are advising people to consider wearing a face covering if they can in enclosed public spaces where social distancing is impossible, for example on public transport or in shops. This may help prevent you spreading the virus to others.
You do not need a clinical mask which is prioritised for our healthcare workers. Instead a face covering is sufficient and we encourage people to make these at home with items they will already own."

Professor Chris Whitty, Chief Medical Officer said: "Wearing a face covering is an added precaution that may have some benefit in reducing the likelihood that a person with the infection passes it on.
The most effective means of preventing the spread of this virus remains following social distancing rules and washing your hands regularly. It does not remove the need to self-isolate if you have symptoms.
COVID-19 can be spread directly by droplets from coughs, sneezes and speaking. These droplets can also be picked up from surfaces by touch and subsequently from touching the face. That is why hand hygiene is so important in controlling the infection.
Evidence shows a face covering can help in reducing the spread of droplets and therefore potentially infecting others, and could help to reduce the spread of infection as lockdown measures start to be lifted. It is important people refrain from touching their face covering when wearing it, where possible, to avoid hand to mask transmission of the virus."


Government will not be supplying face coverings centrally as at home items and fabrics readily available on the market can be used, but it is important to wash them after every use.

Research from the WHO showed that where masks were recommended for prolonged periods of time, some wearers failed to maintain good handwashing practices or follow social distancing policies, putting others at risk. As England has demonstrated strong adherence to social distancing, the government is confident face coverings can be recommended as an added precaution in certain environments rather than an essential part of social distancing policies.

For workers in various sectors, or in public transport, the government is advising they continue to follow the advice of their employers and make sensible workplace adjustments. Further guidance on safer workplaces and on transport will be published shortly.

Government has produced guidance for employees and in it they emphasise and reassure employers that for the majority the most effective way they can ensure that their employees are safe at work is to make sensible workplace adjustments, including erecting perspex screens which many supermarkets have already introduced.

Face coverings do not need to be worn in schools.

Government launches new portal for care homes to arrange coronavirus testing

Published 11 May 2020

All care home staff and residents are now eligible for testing with priority for those in homes that look after the over-65s.

A new online portal that makes it easy for care homes to arrange deliveries of coronavirus test kits has been launched today.

As the national testing capacity has increased, the government is prioritising testing for care homes and other areas with the greatest need.

All symptomatic and asymptomatic care home staff and residents in England are now eligible for testing. Testing will be prioritised for care homes that look after the over 65s.
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care Matt Hancock said: " The additional testing capacity we have achieved delivers many thousands of tests a day for residents and staff in care homes.
This new portal allows those who book tests for staff and residents to do so even more easily, and it also offers a route for the prioritisation of care homes with the greatest need.
We will continue to grow our testing capacity, as we know the certainty and confidence that high quality testing can provide."

Minister of State for Care Helen Whately said: " Care homes are on the frontline in the fight against COVID-19 and we are determined that staff have everything they need to keep themselves and their residents safe. Testing is a crucial part of this. It helps prevent and control outbreaks and means steps can be taken to reduce the spread the virus and protect the most vulnerable.
By prioritising thousands of tests for care home staff and residents, we can target our national testing capacity in the areas and care homes with the greatest need."

The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) is working with local authority Directors of Public Health, Directors of Adult Social Services and local NHS providers to deliver this testing programme for care homes.

Tens of thousands of care home workers and residents have already been tested, either by Public Health England or at drive-through testing sites, mobile testing units and via satellite testing kits - packages of tests sent to care homes for staff to use on residents.

Testing asymptomatic workers helps prevent and control outbreaks. It means those who test positive can be isolated, reducing the number of people who can spread the virus and protecting the most vulnerable. It also helps to build up a strategic understanding of the prevalence of the virus in local areas and the sector as a whole.  

Test results for residents will be communicated to the care home managers. This information will also be provided to councils in order to help manage coronavirus outbreaks in local areas.

Coronavirus test, track and trace plan launched on Isle of Wight

May 5th 2020

Isle of Wight residents will be the first to get access to a new contact tracing app as part of government action to minimise the spread of COVID-19.

Isle of Wight announced as first phase of new ‘test, track and trace’ programme

Rollout of NHS COVID-19 App to begin with the island’s NHS and council staff tomorrow, with all island residents to get access from Thursday

Data privacy and security paramount, with National Cyber Security Centre involved in app development

The app will be complemented by enhanced contact tracing using existing methods online and over the phone

Isle of Wight residents will be the first to be offered access to a new contact tracing app, as part of government action to test, track and trace to minimise the spread of COVID-19 and move towards safely reducing lockdown measures.

Everyone on the island will receive access to the official NHS COVID-19 contact tracing app from this Thursday, with NHS and council staff able to download from 4pm tomorrow, Tuesday 5 May.
Part of a new test, track and trace programme, the app will work together with enhanced contact tracing services and swab testing for those with potential COVID-19 symptoms to help minimise the spread of COVID-19.

Developed by NHSX, the technology arm of the health service, and a team of world-leading scientists and doctors, the app is designed to significantly speed up contact tracing, helping reduce the chance of the virus spreading by enabling us to rapidly identify people most at risk of infection so they can take action to protect themselves, the people they care about and the NHS.

When someone reports symptoms through the app, it will detect any other app users that the person has been in significant contact with over the past few days, including unknown contacts such as someone they may have sat next to on public transport. The app will be able to anonymously alert these contacts and provide advice, including how to get a test to confirm whether or not they do have COVID-19. Users will be able order tests through the app shortly.

For those who may not have access to the app, or the ability to use a smartphone, there will be an option to report symptoms and order tests in other ways. As the integrated service develops, everyone who reports symptoms, including app users, will also be asked to record recent contacts using an online service (or through a telephone interview if they prefer), so that contact tracers can reach all contacts who may be at risk, whether or not those contacts are app users. Contacts will then be alerted either by the app or by email or telephone, advising them to self-isolate or offering public health advice.

As the test, track and trace programme rolls out nationally, expected in mid-May, Public Health England will oversee the deployment of 18,000 additional contact tracers to support the programme.

This first phase is a major step forward in the government’s next phase of the coronavirus strategy and will improve understanding of how this new integrated approach to test, track and trace will work for the rest of the population.

NHS and council staff will be emailed a download link on Tuesday afternoon. From Thursday the app will then open for all residents on the Isle of Wight. All households will receive a leaflet with clear instructions on how to download and use the app on Thursday, and a targeted marketing campaign will begin on Friday.

Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock said:"The Isle of Wight is playing a vital role with this pioneering work to help keep Britain safe. This will pave the way for a nationwide roll-out when the time is right. Coronavirus is one of the greatest challenges our country has ever faced and this app will play a vital role in getting Britain back on her feet.

" The app will help control the spread of coronavirus by alerting people they may have come into contact with it and recommending appropriate action.
This ground-breaking technology, combined with our heroic frontline health and social care staff, and both a nationwide contact tracing testing programme will ensure that we remain in the best position to move toward easing the lockdown."

Matthew Gould, Chief Executive of NHSX, said: "Technology can help us get the country back on its feet. By launching the NHS COVID-19 app we can reduce transmission of the virus by alerting people who may have been exposed, so they can take action to protect themselves, the people they care about and the NHS. When combined with testing and enhanced web and phone contact tracing, this will help the country return to normality and beat coronavirus"


Coronavirus testing extended to all essential workers in England who have symptoms


All essential workers in England and members of their households who are showing symptoms of coronavirus will now be able to get tested.

The biggest widening of access to coronavirus testing made possible due to substantially increased testing capacity

Essential workers with coronavirus symptoms can get tested, helping them return to work if test is negative

Broad range of testing methods being rolled-out to increase accessibility, including home testing kits, mobile testing sites and satellite testing kits

New campaign to provide clear information for essential workers on how to get a test

All essential workers in England, and members of their households who are showing symptoms of coronavirus will now be able to get tested, the government has announced.

This will mean individuals and people they live with will have the reassurance of knowing whether their symptoms are caused by coronavirus and can decide whether they are well enough to return to work.

A new campaign will help essential workers in England - including NHS and care staff, teachers, hospital cleaners, public servants, the emergency services, supermarket staff, delivery drivers, and other critical infrastructure staff - to access testing.

Booking the test has been made simpler via a new online system. From today, employers can register and refer self-isolating staff, and from tomorrow employees will be able to book a test directly for themselves or members of their household who are experiencing symptoms – a high temperature or new continuous cough.

This will speed up the process of getting an appointment and take the burden off employers, helping reach everyone who has symptoms at the earliest opportunity.

Secretary of State for Health and Social Care Matt Hancock said: “We have already prioritised testing for patients and health and social care workers and other key workers today I can go further.
We are making it easier, faster and simpler for any essential worker in England who needs a test to get a test. From today, employers of essential workers will be able to go on GOV.UK to get a test for any of their staff who need a test. And from tomorrow, any essential workers who need a test will be able to book an appointment on GOV.UK themselves directly."

“This all applies for people in essential workers’ households who need a test too. It’s all part of getting Britain back on her feet.”

Essential workers using the new portal can enter their details and will then receive a text or email the same day inviting them to either book an appointment at one of more than 30 drive-through testing sites across the country, or receive a home testing kit.

Test results from the drive-through sites will be sent out by text within 48 hours, and within 72 hours of collection of the home delivery tests.

The aim is that most people should not have to drive for more than 45 minutes to get to a regional testing site. However, additional testing methods are being rolled-out to support testing accessibility:

A network of new mobile testing units is being rapidly established. These will travel the country to reach care homes, police stations, prisons and other sites where there is demand for testing. The units have been designed to clinical requirements by army engineers and can be easily set up in under 20 minutes.

The new mobile units will work alongside the drive-through test sites, together sending thousands of patient samples to the network of Lighthouse Labs, to rapidly increase the number of tests completed each day.

A delivery service for home testing kits has been designed with key industry partners, including Royal Mail and Amazon. The home delivery service will come on line from tomorrow. The availability of home testing kits will initially be limited, but more will become available soon. This will ensure those not able to travel to a test centre can still take the test, find out their results and return to work if possible.

Working with Public Health England, the Care Quality Commission and the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, the government is sending packages of ‘satellite’ test kits directly to care homes across England, to enable testing of symptomatic residents.

Since the beginning of April, the government has significantly increased the UK’s coronavirus testing capacity and is on track to provide 100,000 tests a day by the end of the month.

The 3 new Lighthouse Labs in Milton Keynes, Glasgow and Alderley Park in Cheshire are increasing the country’s capacity to test for coronavirus, with each site scaling up to test tens of thousands of patient samples each day. Each individual site took just 3 weeks to complete and begin testing, staffed by an army of highly qualified staff and volunteers from industry and academia across the country.

 


 Live Webinars available as tutorials for understanding CJRS payments, but limited so hurry.



As part of the government’s commitment to provide support to businesses and employers during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, HMRC have been offering live webinars on the Job Retention Scheme.

The following live webinar provides an overview of the support available to help employers and your employees deal with the economic impacts of COVID-19.

Places are extremely limited so please save your place now.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Job Retention Scheme

During this webinar we’ll be taking a look at:
• furloughed workers
• who can apply for the scheme
• following the rules of the scheme
• how much may be claimed
• how to claim and what you’ll need to claim.

Choose a date and time


If you’ve missed any of our other recent webinars, or have been unable to join, you can now view a recording on HMRC’s YouTube channel.


Prepare to make a claim through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

April 17


HMRC are now writing to tell you how and when to access the system with some more information about what you will need to have ready before the system goes live.


We are also updating you on an important change to the scheme relating to employee eligibility:

• you can claim for employees that were employed as of 19 March 2020 and were on your PAYE payroll on or before that date; this means that you will have made an RTI submission notifying us of payment of that employee on or before 19 March 2020

• employees that were employed as of 28 February 2020 and on payroll (i.e. notified to us on an RTI submission on or before 28 February) and were made redundant or stopped working for you after that, and prior to 19 March 2020, can also qualify for the scheme if you re-employ them and put them on furlough.

More information on this can be found on GOV.UK.

How to claim

As you prepare to make a claim, please note:

• the online claim service will be launched on GOV.UK on 20 April 2020 – please do not try to access it before this date as it won’t be available
• the only way to make a claim is online – the service should be simple to use and any support you need available on GOV.UK; this will include help with calculating the amount you can claim
• you can make the claim yourself even if you usually use an agent
• claims will be paid within 6 working days; you should not contact us unless it is absolutely necessary – any queries should be directed to your agent, representative or our webchat service
• we cannot answer any queries from employees – they will need to raise these with you, as their employer, directly.

Information you will need before you make a claim

In addition to the information in our previous email, you will need to have the following before 20 April 2020:

• a Government Gateway (GG) ID and password – if you don’t already have a GG account, you can apply for one online, or by going to GOV.UK and searching for 'HMRC services: sign in or register'
• be enrolled for PAYE online – if you aren’t registered yet, you can do so now, or by going to GOV.UK and searching for 'PAYE Online for employers'
• the following information for each furloughed employee you will be claiming for:

1. Name.
2. National Insurance number.
3. Claim period and claim amount.
4. PAYE/employee number (optional).

• if you have fewer than 100 furloughed staff – you will need to input information directly into the system for each employee
• if you have 100 or more furloughed staff – you will need to upload a file with information for each employee; we will accept the following file types: .xls .xlsx .csv .ods.


 

Coronavirus (COVID-19): personal protective equipment (PPE) hub

Latest Guidance and new PPE Hub

Guidance about coronavirus (COVID-19) personal protective equipment (PPE).
Last updated 12 April 2020 —

This guidance contains information on personal protective equipment (PPE), and infection prevention and control (IPC).

We are currently experiencing sustained transmission of COVID-19 across the UK.

More guidance on coronavirus (COVID-19) can be found on our main guidance page.

View the government’s UK-wide personal protective equipment plan.

Health and social care settings

Those most at risk within the UK are professionals working in health and social care sectors.

This because these sectors are responsible for providing essential treatment and care for those who are confirmed to have COVID-19, are symptomatic or are highly vulnerable. They are in prolonged close contact with individuals who are symptomatic or particularly vulnerable to infection.

The UK government and devolved administrations published clear guidance on appropriate PPE for health and social care workers. This has been written and reviewed by all 4 UK public health bodies and informed by NHS infection prevention control experts. Our guidance is consistent with World Health Organization (WHO) guidance for protecting health and social care workers from COVID-19.
COVID-19: infection prevention and control (IPC)

12 April 2020 Guidance

COVID-19: infection prevention and control (IPC)
12 April 2020 Guidance
COVID-19: personal protective equipment use for aerosol generating procedures
10 April 2020 Guidance
COVID-19: personal protective equipment use for non-aerosol generating procedures
8 April 2020 Guidance

Non-health and social care settings

For other workers and sectors, based on current evidence, there is very little scientific evidence of widespread benefit from PPE. Instead, practising good hand hygiene and social distancing is key to minimising the risk of infection.

We emphasise and reassure employers that for the majority the most effective way they can ensure that their employees are safe at work is to:

where possible, alter business-as-usual ways of working to ensure social distancing can take place. In some circumstances this could involve the erection of physical ‘splash barriers’ to decrease staff anxiety, or redesign of customer flows to minimise contact opportunities

ensure staff are aware and signs are visible in the workplace reminding employees and customers not to enter the premises if they have COVID-19 symptoms such as a high temperature or persistent cough (or a member of their household displays symptoms) and to avoid touching their eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands

that employees are provided with regular breaks to allow them to wash their hands for 20 seconds. Break areas and break times should also be set up to allow for social distancing to occur to minimise contact during these times

Further Updated Details from HMRC with links

April 2020

HMRC confirms that the employer guidance and guidance for employees have been further updated in line with some of the main queries we have received from stakeholders. Whilst all the guidance has been refreshed, the main areas I would draw your attention to are:
• the more detailed information on scheme eligibility
• further information on how to calculate a claim
• clarification of what constitutes wages.

HMRC encourages you to please review the links above if you would like more information about the scheme.

Health Secretary sets out plan to carry out 100,000 coronavirus tests a day


April 2nd

New 5-pillar plan outlines national effort to increase testing to 100,000 a day in England

England will carry out 100,000 tests for coronavirus every day by the end of this month, Health Secretary Matt Hancock pledged today.

Increased testing for the NHS will form part of a new 5-pillar plan, bringing together government, industry, academia, the NHS and many others, to dramatically increase the number of tests being carried out each day.

Professor John Newton the Director of Health Improvement for Public Health England, has been appointed to help deliver the new plans and bring together industry, universities, NHS and government behind the ambitious testing targets.

He will coordinate a national effort with global manufacturers encouraged to expand their manufacturing capacity here in England; our strongest, home grown businesses in life sciences and other industries are encouraged to turn their resources to creating and rolling out mass testing at scale, and the government will support anyone with a scalable scientific idea or innovation to start a business.

New testing capabilities for the NHS and their families will support staff who are isolating at home to return safely to work if the test is negative, and keep themselves and others safe if the test is positive.

Significant progress to increase testing has already taken place across the country to protect the vulnerable, support our NHS, and ultimately save lives. New testing centres have been established at the main hotspots of the disease, and the UK has already conducted more than 152,000 tests. The 5-pillar plan sets targets to expand the England’s capability further.

The new 5-pillar plan outlines the ambitions to:

Scale up swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a medical need and the most critical workers to 25,000 a day by mid to late April;

Deliver increased commercial swab testing for critical key workers in the NHS, before then expanding to key workers in other sectors;

Develop blood testing to help know if people have the right antibodies and so have high levels of immunity to coronavirus;

Conduct surveillance testing to learn more about the spread of the disease and help develop new tests and treatments; and

Create a new National Effort for testing, to build a mass-testing capacity at a completely new scale.

Once widespread testing is available, we will prioritise repeated testing of critical key workers, to keep them safe and make sure that they do not spread the virus.

Over time, plans announced today will also see increasing focus on testing to see if people have already had the virus, to identify if they have the antibodies that will give them immunity against catching it again. This science is new and developing, but the aim is for a successful test that can be rolled out at scale, that could allow critical workers - and then the wider population - to return to work and their daily lives.

26.03.20

The Chancellor, on March 26th, announced a new Self-employment Income Support Scheme to support self-employed people who have been adversely affected by COVID-19.


GOV‌.UK has further details about who is eligible for the scheme and how it will work

Self-employed people do not need to get in touch with HMRC as the scheme isn’t yet open for applications. HMRC will contact eligible customers by the beginning of June, inviting them to apply.
Deferral of Self Assessment Income Tax payments due in July 2020 and VAT payments due from 20 March 2020 until 3‌0‌‌ June 2020

Financial support for people and businesses

20th March

The Chancellor, this evening, announced further measures to support people and businesses through this period of disruption caused by COVID-19.

The Chancellor’s statement can be found at GOV.UK.

Updated guidance for employers, businesses and employees is available at:


We will continue to share the most up to date information directly with you as it becomes available.

Routine Eyecare by Optical Practices ordered to cease on March 23rd in Scotland


Read the news story on Opchat News here

And read the Scottish Memo containing reparation costs and claiming instructions

Read full memo here


 

Key Workers

The government has defined key workers


As including, but not limited to, ‘doctors, nurses, midwives, paramedics, social workers, care workers, and other frontline health and social care staff including volunteers; the support and specialist staff required to maintain the UK’s health and social care sector…’

Health and social care

This includes but is not limited to doctors, nurses, midwives, paramedics, social workers, care workers, and other frontline health and social care staff including volunteers; the support and specialist staff required to maintain the UK’s health and social care sector; those working as part of the health and social care supply chain, including producers and distributers of medicines and medical and personal protective equipment.

Read the full key worker list here

The College of Optometrists are seeking clarity on this point. In the meantime, they believe that optometrists and staff that are required to maintain services fall within this definition, and their children should be allowed to attend school.


 

The government will increase number of people tested for COVID-19 to 25,000 hospital patients a day.

3:08pm, 18 March 2020

New Indemnity Scheme for clinical negligence

New indemnity scheme for historical clinical negligence claims in general practice introduced
Page summary
The Existing Liabilities Scheme for General Practice (ELSGP) will provide general practice staff with cover for historical NHS clinical negligence claims.

New indemnity scheme for historical clinical negligence claims in general practice introduced


17.03.20

New guidance to stay at home for 14 days

if someone in your household has symptoms of COVID-19 is the focus of the next stage of a public awareness campaign launched by Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock today.

The new guidance will set out that individuals will still be asked to self-isolate for 7 days from the onset of COVID-19 symptoms but any individuals in the household will now be asked to self-isolate for 14 days from that moment as well.

If other members of your household develop symptoms, however mild, at any time during the 14 days, they must not leave the home for 7 days from when symptoms started.

The new phase of the campaign will build on the existing TV, radio, online, digital and billboard adverts currently visible all over the country. These reinforce the importance of washing your hands more often and for 20 seconds, and ask people to self-isolate for 7 days if they develop a high temperature or a new continuous cough, however mild.

Government has taken the further measure of asking whole households to isolate because it is likely that people living with others will infect each other or be infected already. Staying at home for 14 days will greatly reduce the overall amount of infection the household could pass on to others in the community.

The Prime Minister also today set out a number of social distancing measures to reduce the risk of infection from the spread of coronavirus. For those who remain well, are under 70 or do not have an underlying health condition, they are advised to limit their social contact where possible, including using less public transport, working at home and considering not going to pubs, restaurants, theatres and bars.

For those who are over 70, have an underlying health condition or are pregnant, they are strongly advised against these activities and to significantly limit face-to-face interaction with friends and family if possible.

The government’s public awareness campaign offers clear, practical advice so people can play their part in preventing and slowing the spread of the virus.

The most important thing individuals can do to protect themselves remains washing their hands more often, for at least 20 seconds, with soap and water. Make sure you cough or sneeze into a tissue, put it in a bin and wash your hands.

The awareness campaign also reiterates the importance of seeking help online by visiting NHS.UK/coronavirus to check your symptoms and follow the medical advice, rather than visiting your GP.

It also urges people with any symptoms to avoid contact with older and more vulnerable people.

Only if symptoms become worse should people use the NHS 111 service. To ensure the phone service is readily available to those who need it, where possible people should use the 111 website rather than calling.

Earlier this month, the Prime Minister published a ‘battle plan’ for tackling the disease in the UK, which sets out plans for a range of scenarios. Last week, the Prime Minister confirmed the UK has moved into the second stage of this plan, the ‘delay’ phase.

Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock said:

Coronavirus is the biggest public health crisis we have faced in a generation, and we will do whatever is necessary to protect our elderly and most vulnerable people and keep the public safe.

This is an unprecedented situation and it’s so important for each of us to rally together and do our bit to protect ourselves and each other, as well as our NHS, from this disease.

Washing hands regularly for 20 seconds or more remains the single most important thing each of us can do, but we now also need to ask everyone in a household to stay at home if anyone in their home shows symptoms.

Combating this virus will require a huge national effort. We must do all we can to save lives, protect the NHS and keep the most vulnerable people in our society safe.


 The government has today published new and updated guidance to provide affected sectors

Partly superseded

Here is their latest advice on managing the threat from COVID-19. The Public Health England (PHE) guidance provides important information for specific sectors, including schools and transport, on what precautions to take, what to do if someone develops symptoms and how to limit the spread of the virus.
The guidance will assist staff, employers and members of the public after the government last week shifted into the ‘delay’ phase of its action plan to slow the spread of the virus, reduce pressures on the NHS and protect the most vulnerable.

New and updated COVID-19 industry guidance: Guidance has also been published on how to clean non-healthcare settings such as offices or hotel rooms where a person with possible or confirmed COVID-19 has spent time while experiencing symptoms.

The guidance recommends a range of measures for different industries, including:

using announcements in transport hubs to reinforce key messages, such as washing hands before and after travel, and what to do if unwell

if anyone becomes unwell with a new continuous cough or a high temperature, they should be sent home, to their room or the place they are staying. If they have to use public transport, they should try to keep away from other people and catch coughs and sneezes in a tissue

objects and surfaces that are touched regularly should be frequently cleaned and disinfected using standard cleaning products

The advice for these settings continues to be not to close unless advised to do so by the local Public Health England Health Protection Team or the government.

It comes after the Health and Social Care Secretary announced an expanded public awareness campaign asking people to self-isolate for 7 days if they develop a high temperature or a new continuous cough, however mild.

The most important thing individuals can do to protect themselves remains washing hands more often, for at least 20 seconds, with soap and water.

The next phase of the awareness campaign reiterates the importance of seeking help online by visiting NHS.UK/coronavirus to check symptoms and follow the medical advice, rather than visiting a GP.

Out of Containment and into Delay 12/03/2020

The Government has announced that we are moving out of the contain phase and into delay, in response to the ongoing coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.

The UK Chief Medical Officers have now raised the risk to the UK from moderate to high.

As per the current advice, the most important thing individuals can do to protect themselves remains washing their hands more often, for at least 20 seconds, with soap and water. Make sure you cough or sneeze into a tissue, put it in a bin and wash your hands.

We are asking anyone who shows certain symptoms to self-isolate for 7 days, regardless of whether they have travelled to affected areas. This means we want people to stay at home and avoid all but essential contact with others for 7 days from the point of displaying mild symptoms, to slow the spread of infection.

The symptoms are: * A high temperature (37.8 degrees and above) * A new, continuous cough

You do not need to call NHS 111 to go into self-isolation. If your symptoms worsen during home isolation or are no better after 7 days contact NHS 111 online at 111.nhs.uk. If you have no internet access, you should call NHS 111. For a medical emergency dial 999.

In the coming weeks, we will be introducing further social distancing measures for older and vulnerable people, asking them to self-isolate regardless of symptoms.

If we introduce this next stage too early, the measures will not protect us at the time of greatest risk but could have a huge social impact. We need to time this properly, continue to do the right thing at the right time, so we get the maximum effect for delaying the virus. We will clearly announce when we ask the public to move to this next stage.

Our decisions are based on careful modelling.

We will only introduce measures that are supported by clinical and scientific evidence.

Number of cases

Now you can track the increase per day and the county by county spread every day by clicking here


New Measures and a move to DELAY

All school trips cancelled, elderly advised against cruises,

What to do if you have symptoms


Stay at home for 7 days if you have either:

  • a high temperature
  • a new continuous cough

This will help to protect others in your community while you are infectious.

Do not go to a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital.

You do not need to contact NHS 111 to tell them you’re staying at home.

We will not be testing people who are self-isolating with mild symptoms.

Its loooking bleek for large gatherings: football season might be suspended

As providers of health care in a primary setting can we really risk healthcare conferences over the nest 6 months+?

Diagnosis and analysis

The UK is one of the first countries outside China to have a prototype specific laboratory test for this new disease. Healthcare professionals who are contacted by a patient with symptoms following travel to an affected area have been advised to submit samples to PHE for testing. Individuals should be treated in isolation.

After the experience of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2003, PHE developed a series of diagnostic tests to detect any member of the family of coronaviruses. These have been used for several years, and were able to detect the first UK case of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) in 2012.

With the first reported publication of the genome sequence of a 2019 novel coronavirus, PHE was able to rapidly develop further specific tests for this virus, working with WHO and global network of laboratories.

When a clinician suspects novel coronavirus (COVID-19), they take samples from the nose, throat and deeper respiratory samples, package and send them safely to PHE Colindale. PHE can provide a laboratory result from this specific virus on the same working day.

PHE also has the capability to sequence the viral genome and compare this to published sequences from China, if a case occurs. This will provide valuable information on any mutations in the virus over time and allow an improved understanding of how it spreads.

Dateline 7th August 2020

For full information click here


We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 834 new infections per day (7 day rolling) (-1 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 7th August, there have been17,801,559 tests, with 309,005 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 6th August, of those tested positive for coronavirus,

Deaths as reported by in News were Total 46511 and increase of 98 (4th August )
Last reported Gov UK Death Figs across all settings, 45,119* have died. (*Not Updated by Gov.uk as from 15th July.)


Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All





294,156
See full stats 871 n/a
Processed


185,980
     
Cum Total 17,801,559   309,005 45119 not GOV updated

Dateline 6th August 2020

For full information click here


We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 835 new infections per day (7 day rolling) (+15 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 6th August, there have been 17,515,234 tests, with 308,134 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 5th August, of those tested positive for coronavirus,

Deaths as reported by in News were Total 46413 and increase of 46 (4th August )
Last reported Gov UK Death Figs across all settings, 45,119* have died. (*Not Updated by Gov.uk as from 15th July.)


Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All




276,935
See full stats 950 n/a
Processed

174,519
     
Cum Total 17,515,234   308,134 45119 not GOV updated

Dateline 5th August 2020

For full information click here

Rolling Average (7 Day) daily infection rate
We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 820 new infections per day (7 day rolling) (+18 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 5th August, there have been 17,210,335 tests, with 307,184 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 4th August, of those tested positive for coronavirus,

Deaths as reported by in News were Total 46364 and increase of 65 (4th August )
Last reported Gov UK Death Figs across all settings, 45,119* have died. (*Not Updated by Gov.uk as from 15th July.)


Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All



264,772
See full stats 892 n/a
Processed

163,422
     
Cum Total 17,210,335   307,184 45119 not GOV updated

Dateline 4th August 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 802 new infections per day (7 day rolling) (+13 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 4th August, there have been16,942,992 tests, with 306,293 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 3rd August, of those tested positive for coronavirus,

Deaths as reported by in News were Total 46299 and increase of 89 (3rd August )
Last reported Gov UK Death Figs across all settings, 45,119* have died. (*Not Updated by Gov.uk as from 15th July.)


Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All





229,526
See full stats 670 n/a
Processed




158,666
     
Cum Total 16,942,992   306,293 45119 not GOV updated

Dateline 3rd August 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 789 new infections per day (7 day rolling) (+36 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 3rd August, there have been16,499,272 tests, with 305,623 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 2nd August, of those tested positive for coronavirus,

Deaths as reported by in News were Total 46210 and increase of 9 (2nd August )
Lat reported Gov UK Death Figs across all settings, 45,119* have died. (*Not Updated by Gov.uk as from 15th July.)


Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All





215,761
See full stats 938 n/a
Processed



163,786
     
Cum Total 16,717,684   305,623 45119 not GOV updated

Dateline 2nd August 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 753 new infections per day (7 day rolling) (+0 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 2nd August, there have been16,499,272 tests, with 304,695 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 1st August, of those tested positive for coronavirus,

Deaths as reported by in News were Total 46201 and increase of 8 (1st August )
Lat reported Gov UK Death Figs across all settings, 45,119* have died. (*Not Updated by Gov.uk as from 15th July.)


Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All




218,046
See full stats 744 n/a
Processed


162,088
     
Cum Total 16,499,272   304,695 45119 not GOV updated

Dateline 1st August 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 753 new infections per day (7 day rolling) (+0 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 1st August, there have been 16,280,223tests, with 303,181 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 31st August, of those tested positive for coronavirus,

Deaths as reported by in News were Total 46193 and increase of 74 (1st August )
Lat reported Gov UK Death Figs across all settings, 45,119* have died. (*Not Updated by Gov.uk as from 15th July.)


Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All




258,796
See full stats 771 n/a
Processed


190,220
     
Cum Total 16,280,223   303,181 45119 not GOV updated

Dateline 31st July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 753 new infections per day (7 day rolling) (+16 on yesterday) Still Upwards!

As of 9am on 31st July, there have been 16,019,907tests, with 303,181 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 30th July, of those tested positive for coronavirus,

Deaths as reported by in News were Total 46119 and increase of 120 (30th July)
Lat reported Gov UK Death Figs across all settings, 45,119* have died. (*Not Updated by Gov.uk as from 15th July.)


Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All



280,232
See full stats 880 n/a
Processed


206,656
     
Cum Total 16,019,907   303,181 45119 not GOV updated

Dateline 30th July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 737 new infections per day (7 day rolling) (+11 on yesterday) Still Upwards!

As of 9am on 30th July, there have been 15,738,735 tests, with 302,301 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 29th July, of those tested positive for coronavirus,

Deaths as reported by in News were Total 45999 and increase of 38 (29th July)
Lat reported Gov UK Death Figs across all settings, 45,119* have died. (*Not Updated by Gov.uk as from 15th July.)


Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All



258,979
See full stats 846 n/a
Processed

165,480
     
Cum Total 15,738,735   302,301 45119 not GOV updated

Dateline 29th July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 726 new infections per day (7 day rolling) (+29 on yesterday) The highest Daily Increase this month!

As of 9am on 29th July, there have been 15,478,728 tests, with 301,455 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 28th July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 45,119* have died. (*Not Updated by Gov.uk as from 15th July.)

Deaths as reported by in News were Total 45961 and increase of 83 (28th July)

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All


280,541
See full stats 726 n/a
Processed

154,946
     
Cum Total 15,478,728   301,455 45119 not GOV updated

Dateline 28th July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 691new infections per day (7 day rolling) (+14 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 28th July, there have been 15,197,099 tests, with 300,692 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 27th July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 45,119* have died. (*Not Updated by Gov.uk as from 15th July.)

Deaths as reported by in News were Total 45878 and increase of 119 (27th July)

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All


214,721
See full stats 581 n/a
Processed

99,090
     
Cum Total 15,197,099   300,692 45119 not updated

Dateline 27th July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 677new infections per day (7 day rolling) (+15 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 27th July, there have been 14,981525 tests, with 300,111 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 26th July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 45,119* have died. (*Not Updated by Gov.uk as from 15th July.)

Deaths as reported by in News were Total 45759 and increase of 7 (25th July)

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All


197,170
See full stats 685 n/a
Processed
113,424
     
Cum Total 14,981,525   300,111 45119 not updated

Dateline 26th July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 662new infections per day (7 day rolling) (+3 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 26th July, there have been 14,794,369 tests, with 299,426 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 25th July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 45,119* have died. (*Not Updated by Gov.uk as from 15th July.)

Deaths as reported by in News were Total 45752 and increase of 14 (25th July)

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All


225,481
See full stats 767 n/a
Processed
142,954
     
Cum Total 14,794,369   298,681 45119 not updated

Dateline 25th July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 659new infections per day (7 day rolling) (-9 on yesterday) 1st Decrease for 10 days

As of 9am on 25th July, there have been 14,568,733 tests, with 298,681 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 24th July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 45,119* have died. (*Not Updated by Gov.uk as from 15th July.)

Deaths as reported by in News were Total 45738 and increase of 61 (25th July)

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All


280,495
See full stats 767 n/a
Processed
157,229
     
Cum Total 14,568,733   298,681 45119 not updated

Dateline 24th July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 668new infections per day (7 day rolling) (+12 on yesterday) 9th Day increase on the run.

As of 9am on 24th July, there have been 14,291,673 tests, with 297,914 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 23rd July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 45,119* have died. (*Not Updated by Gov.uk as from 15th July.)

Deaths as reported by in News were Total 45677 and increase of 123 (24th July)

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All


309,231
See full stats 768 n/a
Processed
152,133
     
Cum Total 14,291,673   297,914 45119 not updated

Dateline 23rd July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 656 new infections per day (7 day rolling) (+18 on yesterday) 8th Day increase on the run.

As of 9am on 23rd July, there have been 13,974,097 tests, with 297,146 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 22nd July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 45,119* have died. (*Not Updated by Gov.uk as from 15th July.)

Deaths as reported by BBC News were Total 45,554 and increase of 53 (23rd July)

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All


207,617
See full stats 769 n/a
Processed
147,595
     
Cum Total 13,974,097   297,146 45119 not updated

Dateline 22nd July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 638 new infections per day (7 day rolling) (+3 on yesterday) 7th Day increase on the run.

As of 9am on 22nd July, there have been 13,763,289 tests, with 296,377 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 21st July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 45,119* have died. (*Not Updated as from 15th July.)

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All

193,745
See full stats 560 n/a
Processed
142,559
     
Cum Total 13,763,289   296,377 45119 not updated

Dateline 21st July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 635 new infections per day (7 day rolling) (+7 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 21st July, there have been 13,572759 tests, with 295,817 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 20th July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 45,119* have died. (*Not Updated as from 15th July.)

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All

150716
See full stats 445 n/a
Processed
101741
     
Cum Total 13,572759   295817 45119 not updated

Dateline 20th July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 628 new infections per day (7 day rolling) (+7 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 20th July, there have been 13,459,190 tests, with 295,372 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 19th July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 45,119* have died. (*Not Updated as from 15th July.)

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All

165,545
See full stats 580 n/a
Processed
120,968
     
Cum Total 13,459,190   295,372 45119 not updated

Dateline 19th July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 621 new infections per day (7 day rolling) (+11 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 19th July, there have been 13,293,523 tests, with 294792 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 18th July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 45,119* have died. (*Not Updated as from 15th July.)

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All 180057 See full stats 726 n/a
Processed
140393
     
Cum Total 13,293,523   294,792 45119 not updated

Dateline 18th July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 610 new infections per day (7 day rolling) (+1 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 18th July, there have been 12,892,406 tests, with 293239 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 17th July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 45,119 have died. Not Updated as from 15th July.

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All 218,003 See full stats 687 n/a
Processed
177,625
     
Cum Total 13,112,764   294,066 45119 not updated

Dateline 17th July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 609 new infections per day (7 day rolling) (+25 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 17th July, there have been 12,892,406 tests, with 293239 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 16th July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 45,119 have died. Not Updated as from 15th July.

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All 219621 See full stats 687 n/a
Processed 165966      
Cum Total 12,892,406   293239 45119 not updated

Dateline 16th July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 584 new infections per day (7 day rolling) (No Change on yesterday)

As of 9am on 16th July, there have been 12,669634 tests, with 292552 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 15th July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 45,119 have died.

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All 202912 See full stats 642 66
Processed 152063      
Cum Total 12669634   292552 45119

Dateline 15th July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 584 new infections per day (7 day rolling) (-17 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 15th July, there have been 12,461,869 tests, with 291,911 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 14th July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 45,053have died.

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All 142168 See full stats 398 85
Processed 132,121      
Cum Total 12,461,869   291,911 45,053

Dateline 14th July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 597 new infections per day (7 day rolling)first downturn ofr a few days (-27 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 14th July, there have been 12,270,317 tests, with 291,373 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 13th July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 44819 have died.

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All 142168 See full stats 398 138
Processed 97403      
Cum Total 12,270,317   291,3733 44968

Dateline 13th July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 624 new infections per day (7 day rolling) continuing increase for some time (+26 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 13th July, there have been 12,128,749 tests, with 290,133 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 12th July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 44819 have died.

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All 144455 See full stats 530 11
Processed 101927      
Cum Total 12128749   290,133 44819

Dateline 12th July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 598 new infections per day (7 day rolling) continuing increase for some time (+19 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 12th July, there have been 11990257 tests, with 289603 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 11th July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 44819 have died.

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All 207387 See full stats 650 44
Processed 134890      
Cum Total 11990257   289603 44819

Dateline 11th July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 579 new infections per day (7 day rolling) largest increase for some time (+28 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 11th July, there have been 11782192 tests, with 288953 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 10th July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 44798 have died.

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All 243078 See full stats 512 148
Processed 153667      
Cum Total 11782192   288953 44798



Dateline 10th July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 551 new infections per day (7 day rolling) Back on track (- 5 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 10th July, there have been 112538519 tests, with 288133 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 9 July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 44650 have died.

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All 250072 See full stats 512 48
Processed 160970      
Cum Total 11538519   288133 44650

Dateline 8th July 2020

Dateline 9th July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 556 new infections per day (7 day rolling) Back on track (+ 10 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 9th July, there have been 11286921 tests, with 245507 tests on 8 July.

287621 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 8 July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 44602 have died.

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All 245507 See full stats 642 85
Processed 152362      
Cum Total 11286921   286,979 44602

Dateline 8th July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 546 new infections per day (7 day rolling) Back on track (-29 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 8th July, there have been 11041203 tests, with 240340 tests on 7 July.

286,979 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 7 July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 44,517 have died.

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All 240340 See full stats 630 126
Processed 125978      
Cum Total 11041203   286,979 44517

Dateline 7th July 2020

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 575 new infections per day (7 day rolling) Back on track (-15 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 7th July, there have been 10,777,399 tests, with 141,807 tests on 6 July.

286,349 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 6 July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 44,391 have died.

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All 141807 See full stats 581 155
Processed 94284      
Cum Total 10,777,399   286,349 44391

Dateline 6th July 2020

The Government has changed its reporting format today with more detail on regions, following a recalculation on test numbers removing those who have been tested more than once.

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 590 new infections per day (7 day rolling) Back on track (-66 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 6th July, there have been 10,651308 tests, with 143457 tests on 5 July.

285768 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 5 July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 44,23620 have died.

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All 143457 See full stats 352 16
Processed 97315      
Cum Total 10651308   285768 44236

Dateline 5th July 2020

The Government has changed its reporting format today with more detail on regions, following a recalculation on test numbers removing those who have been tested more than once.

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 656 new infections per day (7 day rolling) Back on track (-55 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 5th July, there have been 10,505,758 tests, with 164849 tests on 4 July.

285416 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 4 July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 44,220 have died.

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All 164849 See full stats 516 22
Processed 125622      
Cum Total 10505758   285416 44220

Dateline 4th July 2020

The Government has changed its reporting format today with more detail on regions, following a recalculation on test numbers removing those who have been tested more than once.

For full information click here

We will report with only the key facts here:

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate711 new infections per day (7 day rolling) Back on track although slow decline (-38 on yesterday)

As of 9am on 4 July, there have been 10,340,511 tests, with 219544 tests on 3 July.

284,900 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 3 July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 44,198 have died.

Daily Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
All 219544 See full stats 624 67
Processed 171540      
Cum Total 10340511   284900 44198

Dateline 3rd July 2020

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate749 new infections per day (7 day rolling) Back on track although slow decline

As of 9am on 3 July, there have been 10,120,276 tests, with 205,673 tests on 2 July.

284,276 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 2 July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 44,131 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 205,673 Unavailable 544 137
Total 10,120,276 Unavailable 284,276 44,131

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 22,574 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 46,473 124,473 27,525 7,202 205,673
Positive 140 404 - - 544

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,905,178 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 2,993,828 5,256,156 1,092,830 777,462 10,120,276
Positive 197,571 86,705 - - 284,276

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 44,068 80,405 124,473
Cumulative 2,195,870 3,060,286 5,256,156

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

Tests processed Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 5,992 1,210 7,202
Cumulative 212,130 565,332 777,462

Dateline 2nd July 2020

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 815 new infections per day (7 day rolling) Back on track although slow decline

As of 9am on 2 July, there have been 9,914,663 tests, with 252,084 tests on 1 July.

283,757 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 1 July, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 43,995 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 252,084 Unavailable 576 89
Total 9,914,663 Unavailable 283,757 43,995

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 27,337 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 49,258 168,921 29,401 4,504 252,084
Positive 186 390 - - 576

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,882,643 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 2,947,392 5,130,686 1,066,325 770,260 9,914,663
Positive 197,431 86,326 - - 283,757

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 50,481 118,080 168,921
Cumulative 2,151,871 2,978,815 5,130,686

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

Tests processed Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 3,449 1,055 4,504
Cumulative 206,138 564,122 770,260

Dateline 1st July 2020

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 893 new infections per day (7 day rolling) First time increase for a while

As of 9am on 1 July, there have been 9,662,051 tests, with 226,398 tests on 30 June.

313,483 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 30 June, of those tested positive for coronavirus, across all settings, 43,906 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 226,398 Unavailable 829 176
Total 9,662,051 Unavailable 313,483 43,906

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 22,572 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 47,474 146,624 26,622 5,678 226,398
Positive 214 615 - - 829

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,896,609 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 2,897,765 4,961,632 1,036,898 765,756 9,662,051
Positive 197,246 116,237 - - 313,483

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 46,381 100,243 146,624
Cumulative 2,101,149 2,860,483 4,961,632

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

Tests processed Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 4,603 1,075 5,678
Cumulative 202,689 563,067 765,756

Dateline 30th June 2020

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 867 new infections per day (7 day rolling) Almost similar to lockdown day at 833/day but a way to go

As of 9am on 30 June, there have been 9,426,631 tests, with 133,467 tests on 29 June.

312,654 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 29 June, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 43,730 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 133,467 Unavailable 689 155
Total 9,426,631 Unavailable 312,654 43,730

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 21,939 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 39,169 63,340 22,559 8,399 133,467
Positive 226 463 - - 689

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,874,037 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 2,850,314 4,814,779 1,010,203 751,335 9,426,631
Positive 197,032 115,622 - - 312,654

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 11,245 52,095 63,340
Cumulative 2,054,882 2,759,897 4,814,779

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

Tests processed Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 4,758 3,641 8,399
Cumulative 189,343 561,992 751,335

Dateline 29th June 2020

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 894 new infections per day (7 day rolling) Almost similar to lockdown day at 833/day but a way to go.

As of 9am on 29 June, there have been 9,290,215 tests, with 93,881 tests on 28 June.

311,965 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 28 June, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 43,575 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 93,881 Unavailable 815 25
Total 9,290,215 Unavailable 311,965 43,575

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 17,724 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 30,656 49,054 5,928 8,243 93,881
Positive 220 595 - - 815

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,852,098 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 2,808,681 4,750,954 987,644 742,936 9,290,215
Positive 196,806 115,159 - - 311,965

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 23,655 25,399 49,054
Cumulative 2,043,866 2,707,088 4,750,954

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

Tests processed Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 3,243 5,000 8,243
Cumulative 184,585 558,351 742,936

Dateline 28th June 2020

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 914 new infections per day (7 day rolling) Almost similar to lockdown day at 833/day but a way to go.

As of 9am on 28 June, there have been 9,195,132 tests, with 127,709 tests on 27 June.

311,151 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 27 June, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 43,550 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 127,709 Unavailable 901 36
Total 9,195,132 Unavailable 311,151 43,550

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 21,837 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 40,854 68,324 14,929 3,602 127,709
Positive 169 732 - - 901

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,834,374 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 2,777,265 4,701,918 981,256 734,693 9,195,132
Positive 196,587 114,564 - - 311,151

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 34,641 33,683 68,324
Cumulative 2,020,498 2,681,420 4,701,918

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

Tests processed Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 3,602 0 3,602
Cumulative 181,342 553,351 734,693

Dateline 27th June 2020

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 960 new infections per day (7 day rolling) Almost similar to lockdown day at 833/day but a way to go.

As of 9am on 27 June, there have been 9,067,577 tests, with 155,359 tests on 26 June.

310,250 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 26 June, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 43,514 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 155,359 Unavailable 890 100
Total 9,067,577 Unavailable 310,250 43,514

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 22,965 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 43,839 55,156 35,711 20,653 155,359
Positive 246 644 - - 890

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,812,537 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 2,736,411 4,633,748 966,327 731,091 9,067,577
Positive 196,418 113,832 - - 310,250

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 30,328 24,828 55,156
Cumulative 1,986,011 2,647,737 4,633,748

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

Tests processed Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 3,226 17,427 20,653
Cumulative 177,740 553,351 731,091

Dateline 26th June 2020

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 1018 new infections per day (7 day rolling)

As of 9am on 26 June, there have been 8,911,226 tests, with 165,665 tests on 25 June.

309,360 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 25 June, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 43,414 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 165,665 Unavailable 1,006 186
Total 8,911,226 Unavailable 309,360 43,414

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 21,346 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 42,153 67,736 36,438 19,338 165,665
Positive 247 759 - - 1,006

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,789,572 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 2,692,572 4,577,600 930,616 710,438 8,911,226
Positive 196,172 113,188 - - 309,360

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 34,584 33,152 67,736
Cumulative 1,955,860 2,621,740 4,577,600

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

Tests processed Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 2,824 16,514 19,338
Cumulative 174,514 535,924 710,438

Dateline 25th June 2020

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 1066 new infections per day (7 day rolling)

As of 9am on 25 June, there have been 8,710,292 tests, with 167,023 tests on 24 June.

307,980 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 24 June, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 43,230 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 167,023 Unavailable 1,118 149
Total 8,710,292 Unavailable 307,980 43,230

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 25,176 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 43,620 59,460 36,102 27,841 167,023
Positive 387 731 - - 1,118

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,750,821 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 2,629,977 4,495,020 894,195 691,100 8,710,292
Positive 195,838 112,142 - - 307,980

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 32,406 27,054 59,460
Cumulative 1,907,078 2,587,942 4,495,020

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

Tests processed Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 2,880 24,961 27,841
Cumulative 171,690 519,410 691,100

Dateline 24th June 2020

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 1081 new infections per day (7 day rolling)

As of 9am on 24 June, there have been 8,542,186 tests, with 232,086 tests on 23 June.

306,862 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 23 June, of those who tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 43,081 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 232,086 Unavailable 653 154
Total 8,542,186 Unavailable 306,862 43,081

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 22,698 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 45,784 90,009 35,006 61,287 232,086
Positive 164 489 - - 653

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,725,645 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 2,586,357 4,435,253 857,323 663,253 8,542,186
Positive 195,451 111,411 - - 306,862

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 12,260 77,749 90,009
Cumulative 1,875,004 2,560,249 4,435,253

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

Tests processed Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 2,927 58,360 61,287
Cumulative 168,810 494,443 663,253

Dateline 23rd June 2020

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 1147 new infections per day (7 day rolling)

As of 9am on 23 June, there have been 8,309,929 tests, with 237,142 tests on 22 June.

306,210 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 22 June, of those who tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 42,927 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 237,142 Unavailable 874 171
Total 8,309,929 Unavailable 306,210 42,927

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 21,243 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 36,984 78,127 26,084 95,947 237,142
Positive 271 603 - - 874

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,702,947 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 2,540,573 4,345,332 822,058 601,966 8,309,929
Positive 195,288 110,922 - - 306,210

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 13,045 65,082 78,127
Cumulative 1,862,832 2,482,500 4,345,332

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

Tests processed Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 3,087 92,860 95,947
Cumulative 165,883 436,083 601,966

Dateline 22nd June 2020

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 1205 new infections per day (7 day rolling)


As of 9am on 22 June, there have been 8,029,757 tests, with 139,659 tests on 21 June.

305,289 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 21 June, of those who tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 42,647 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 139,659 Unavailable 958 15
Total 8,029,757 Unavailable 305,289 42,647

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 18,906 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 29,457 96,468 9,902 3,832 139,659
Positive 260 698 - - 958

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,681,704 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 2,500,489 4,267,334 795,915 466,019 8,029,757
Positive 194,970 110,319 - - 305,289

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 14,068 82,400 96,468
Cumulative 1,849,916 2,417,418 4,267,334

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 3,832 0 3,832
Cumulative 162,796 303,223 466,019

Dateline 21st June 2020

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 1219 new infections per day (7 day rolling)

As of 9am on 21 June, there have been 7,890,145 tests, with 175,018 tests on 20 June.

304,331 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 20 June, of those who tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 42,632 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 175,018 Unavailable 1,221 43
Total 7,890,145 Unavailable 304,331 42,632

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 18,913 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 36,118 113,514 20,426 4,960 175,018
Positive 336 885 - - 1,221

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,662,798 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 2,470,849 4,171,096 786,013 462,187 7,890,145
Positive 194,710 109,621 - - 304,331

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 27,726 85,788 113,514
Cumulative 1,836,078 2,335,018 4,171,096

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 4,960 0 4,960
Cumulative 158,964 303,223 462,187

Dateline 20th June 2020

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 1260 new infections per day (7 day rolling)

As of 9am on 20 June, there have been 7715127 tests, with 282013 tests on 20 June.

303110 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 20 June, of those who tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 42,589 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 282013 Unavailable 1295 128
Total 7715127 Unavailable 303110 42589

Daily

Dateline 19th June 2020

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 1279 new infections per day (7 day rolling)

As of 9am on 19 June, there have been 7,433,114 tests, with 169,600 tests on 18 June.

301,815 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 18 June, of those who tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 42,461 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 169,600 Unavailable 1,346 173
Total 7,433,114 Unavailable 301,815 42,461

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 23,472 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 41,620 78,377 44,895 4,708 169,600
Positive 381 965 - - 1,346

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,621,952 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 2,393,809 3,965,280 722,961 351,064 7,433,114
Positive 194,010 107,805 - - 301,815

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 27,797 50,580 78,377
Cumulative 1,779,408 2,185,872 3,965,280

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 3,348 1,360 4,708
Cumulative 149,631 201,433 351,064

Dateline 18th June 2020

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 1307 new infections per day (7 day rolling)

As of 9am on 18 June, there have been 7,259,555 tests, with 136,516 tests on 17 June.

300,469 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 17 June, of those who tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 42,288 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 136,516 Unavailable 1,218 135
Total 7,259,555 Unavailable 300,469 42,288

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 23,244 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 43,035 45,171 44,082 4,228 136,516
Positive 336 882 - - 1,218

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,598,395 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 2,348,319 3,886,704 678,176 346,356 7,259,555
Positive 193,629 106,840 - - 300,469

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 26,541 18,630 45,171
Cumulative 1,751,998 2,134,706 3,886,704

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 2,923 1,305 4,228
Cumulative 146,283 200,073 346,356

Dateline 17th June 2020

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 1314 new infections per day (7 day rolling)

As of 9am on 17 June, there have been 7,121,976 tests, with 140,359 tests on 16 June.

299,251 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 16 June, of those who tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 42,153 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 140,359 Unavailable 1,115 184
Total 7,121,976 Unavailable 299,251 42,153

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 20,399 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 42,540 53,795 39,895 4,129 140,359
Positive 328 787 - - 1,115

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,575,151 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 2,305,284 3,842,418 632,146 342,128 7,121,976
Positive 193,293 105,958 - - 299,251

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 22,761 31,034 53,795
Cumulative 1,726,800 2,115,618 3,842,418

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 2,849 1,280 4,129
Cumulative 143,360 198,768 342,128

Dateline 16th June 2020

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 1298 new infections per day (7 day rolling)

As of 9am on 16 June, there have been 6,981,493 tests, with 113,107 tests on 15 June.

298,136 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 15 June, of those who tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 41,969 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 113,107 Unavailable 1,279 233
Total 6,981,493 Unavailable 298,136 41,969

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 18,375 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 35,711 38,989 28,186 10,221 113,107
Positive 329 950 - - 1,279

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,554,752 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 2,262,744 3,788,546 592,204 337,999 6,981,493
Positive 192,965 105,171 - - 298,136

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 16,066 22,923 38,989
Cumulative 1,704,235 2,084,311 3,788,546

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 4,026 6,195 10,221
Cumulative 140,511 197,488 337,999

16 June notes

To ensure consistent reporting across all pillars we have paused reporting the number of people tested due to an issue with the data for pillar 2. There are a small percentage of cases in pillar 2 where a person has been tested more than once or tested positive for coronavirus more than once. Any incorrect figures identified will be corrected.

The total number of tests has been revised since yesterday’s total after the following changes to the historical data:

  • 201 tests added from the pillar 2 cumulative total
  • 1,704 tests added to the pillar 3 cumulative total

The daily tests reported today have been added to this revised total rather than the total reported yesterday, so the cumulative total today is 1,905 higher than if you added the daily tests to yesterday’s total.

For pillar 2, the cumulative number of in-person tests today is 160 higher than if you added the daily tests to yesterday’s total, and the number of delivery route tests is 361 lower.

The total number of people tested in pillar 1 have been revised since yesterday’s total, after revisions to historical data for England.

The daily people tested reported today have been added to this revised total rather than the total reported yesterday.

The cumulative total today is therefore 8,841 higher than if you added the daily figure to yesterday’s total.

Testing capacity

At 9am on 15 June, testing capacity was 241,540.

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
Lab capacity 65,120 135,000 40,000 1,420 241,540

Dateline 15th June 2020

PHN 7 day rolling infection rate 1313 new infections per day (7 day rolling)

As of 9am on 14 June, there have been 6,772,602 tests, with 144,865 tests on 13 June.

295,889 people have tested positive.

As of 9am on 15 June, there have been 6,866,481 tests, with 93,163 tests on 14 June.

296,857 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 14 June, of those who tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 41,736 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 93,163 Unavailable 1,056 38
Total 6,866,481 Unavailable 296,857 41,736

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 18,783 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 30,700 45,235 13,452 3,776 93,163
Positive 305 751 - - 1,056

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,527,536 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 2,227,033 3,749,356 562,314 327,778 6,866,481
Positive 192,636 104,221 - - 296,857

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 16,757 28,478 45,235
Cumulative 1,688,329 2,061,027 3,749,356

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 3,776 0 3,776
Cumulative 136,485 191,293 327,778

 

Dateline 14th June 2020

As of 5pm on 13 June, of those who tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 41,698 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 144,865 Unavailable 1,514 36
Total 6,772,602 Unavailable 295,889 41,698

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 20,501 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 37,983 82,560 21,337 2,985 144,865
Positive 363 1,151 - - 1,514

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,510,587 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 2,195,481 3,704,325 548,794 324,002 6,772,602
Positive 192,419 103,470 - - 295,889

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 37,264 45,296 82,560
Cumulative 1,672,450 2,031,875 3,704,325

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 2,985 0 2,985
Cumulative 132,709 191,293 324,002

Dateline 13th June 2020

As of 9am 13 June, there have been 6,624,676 tests, with 188,794 tests on 12 June.

294,375 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 12 June, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 41,662 have sadly died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 188,794 Unavailable 1,425 181
Total 6,624,676 Unavailable 294,375 41,662

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 24,634 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 40,426 96,709 46,952 4,707 188,794
Positive 441 984 - - 1,425

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,490,086 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 2,156,643 3,621,996 525,020 321,017 6,624,676
Positive 192,056 102,319 - - 294,375

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 35,720 60,989 96,709
Cumulative 1,635,417 1,986,579 3,621,996

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 3,897 810 4,707
Cumulative 129,724 191,293 321,017

Dateline 12th June 2020

As of 9am on 12 June, there have been 6,434,713 tests, with 193,253 tests on 11 June.

292,950 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 11 June, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 41,481 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 193,253 Unavailable 1,541 202
Total 6,434,713 Unavailable 292,950 41,481

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

 

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 23,703 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 40,058 102,379 46,491 4,325 193,253
Positive 512 1,029 - - 1,541

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,465,452 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 2,115,412 3,525,498 477,493 316,310 6,434,713
Positive 191,615 101,335 - - 292,950

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 42,406 59,973 102,379
Cumulative 1,600,450 1,925,048 3,525,498

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 3,590 735 4,325
Cumulative 125,827 190,483 316,310

Dateline 11th June 2020

As of 9am on 11 June, there have been 6,240,801 tests, with 197,007 tests on 10 June.

291,409 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 10 June, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 41,279 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 197,007 Unavailable 1,266 151
Total 6,240,801 Unavailable 291,409 41,279

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 23,436 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 43,200 105,993 42,979 4,835 197,007
Positive 388 878 - - 1,266

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,441,749 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 2,074,094 3,424,261 430,461 311,985 6,240,801
Positive 191,103 100,306 - - 291,409

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 36,782 69,211 105,993
Cumulative 1,559,816 1,864,445 3,424,261

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 4,035 800 4,835
Cumulative 122,237 189,748 311,985

Dateline 10th June 2020

As of 9am on 10 June, there have been 6,042,622 tests, with 170,379 tests on 9 June.

290,143 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 9 June, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 41,128 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 170,379 Unavailable 1,003 245
Total 6,042,622 Unavailable 290,143 41,128

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 22,248 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 43,052 86,013 37,147 4,167 170,379
Positive 126 877 - - 1,003

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,418,313 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 2,030,819 3,317,669 386,984 307,150 6,042,622
Positive 190,715 99,428 - - 290,143

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 33,760 52,253 86,013
Cumulative 1,523,390 1,794,279 3,317,669

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 3,442 725 4,167
Cumulative 118,202 188,948 307,150

Dateline 9th June 2020

As of 9am on 9 June, there have been 5,870,506 tests, with 102,930 tests on 8 June.

289,140 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 8 June, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 40,883 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 102,930 Unavailable 1,387 286
Total 5,870,506 Unavailable 289,140 40,883

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 23,498 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 32,206 38,934 27,978 3,812 102,930
Positive 710 677 - - 1,387

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,396,065 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 1,987,767 3,230,178 349,578 302,983 5,870,506
Positive 190,589 98,551 - - 289,140

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 13,775 25,159 38,934
Cumulative 1,489,778 1,740,400 3,230,178

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 3,157 655 3,812
Cumulative 114,760 188,223 302,983


Dateline 8th June 2020

As of 9am on 8 June, there have been 5,731,576 tests, with 138,183 tests on 7 June.

287,399 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 7 June, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 40,597 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 138,183 Unavailable 1,205 55
Total 5,731,576 Unavailable 287,399 40,597

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 14,362 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 30,792 87,221 16,694 3,476 138,183
Positive 158 1,047 - - 1,205

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,372,567 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 1,955,561 3,155,973 320,871 299,171 5,731,576
Positive 189,879 97,520 - - 287,399

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 39,282 47,939 87,221
Cumulative 1,441,214 1,714,759 3,155,973

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 3,476 0 3,476
Cumulative 111,603 187,568 299,171

Dateline 7th June 2020

As of 9am on 7 June, there have been 5,581,073 tests, with 142,123 tests on 6 June.

286,194 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 6 June, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 40,542 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 142,123 Unavailable 1,326 77
Total 5,581,073 Unavailable 286,194 40,542

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested Unavailable Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 35,636 79,685 22,720 4,082 142,123
Positive 292 1,034 - - 1,326

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested Unavailable Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 1,924,659 3,059,225 303,264 293,925 5,581,073
Positive 189,721 96,473 - - 286,194

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 40,958 38,727 79,685
Cumulative 1,402,554 1,656,671 3,059,225

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 4,082 0 4,082
Cumulative 108,127 185,798 293,925


Dateline 6th June 2020

As of 9am on 6 June, there have been 5,438,712 tests, with 218,187 tests on 5 June.

284,868 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 5 June, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 40,465 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 218,187 Unavailable 1,557 204
Total 5,438,712 Unavailable 284,868 40,465

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 24,579 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 37,693 134,840 41,619 4,035 218,187
Positive 499 1,058 - - 1,557

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,335,764 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 1,888,571 2,979,774 280,524 289,843 5,438,712
Positive 189,429 95,439 - - 284,868

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 44,696 90,144 134,840
Cumulative 1,361,830 1,617,944 2,979,774

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 4,035 0 4,035
Cumulative 104,045 185,798 289,843

Dateline 5th June 2020

As of 9am on 5 June, there have been 5,214,277 tests, with 207,231 tests on 4 June.

283,311 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 4 June, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 40,261 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 207,231 Unavailable 1,650 357
Total 5,214,277 Unavailable 283,311 40,261

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 21,109 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 39,593 120,027 42,899 4,712 207,231
Positive 559 1,091 - - 1,650

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,311,185 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 1,849,908 2,840,039 238,522 285,808 5,214,277
Positive 188,930 94,381 - - 283,311

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 37,015 83,012 120,027
Cumulative 1,317,562 1,522,477 2,840,039

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 4,712 0 4,712
Cumulative 100,010 185,798 285,808

Dateline 4th June 2020

As of 9am on 4 June, there have been 5,005,565 tests, with 220,057 tests on 3 June.

281,661 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 3 June, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 39,904 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 220,057 Unavailable 1,805 176
Total 5,005,565 Unavailable 281,661 39,904

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 22,977 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 39,735 136,584 40,385 3,353 220,057
Positive 548 1,257 - - 1,805

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,290,076 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 1,810,315 2,719,687 194,467 281,096 5,005,565
Positive 188,371 93,290 - - 281,661

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 40,110 96,474 136,584
Cumulative 1,281,026 1,438,661 2,719,687

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 3,353 0 3,353
Cumulative 95,298 185,798 281,096


Dateline 3rd June 2020

As of 9am on 3 June, there have been 4,786,219 tests, with 171,829 tests on 2 June.

279,856 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 2 June, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, across all settings, 39,728 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 171,829 Unavailable 1,871 359
Total 4,786,219 Unavailable 279,856 39,728

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 19,053 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 38,163 94,735 36,013 2,918 171,829
Positive 585 1,286 - - 1,871

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,267,099 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 1,770,451 2,582,681 155,344 277,743 4,786,219
Positive 187,823 92,033 - - 279,856

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 34,526 60,209 94,735
Cumulative 1,242,284 1,340,397 2,582,681

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 2,918 0 2,918
Cumulative 91,945 185,798 277,743

3 June notes

Reporting on the number of people tested has been temporarily paused to ensure consistent reporting across all pillars. This is due to a small percentage of cases where the same person has had more than one test or tested positive more than once for coronavirus in pillar 2. Corrections will be made to any figures if they have subsequently been found to have an error.

The daily total for tests is 756 higher than the difference between today and yesterday’s cumulative totals. This is due to revisions to historical data to:

  • add 387 tests to the pillar 1 total
  • remove 1,314 tests from the pillar 2 total
  • add 243 tests to the pillar 3 total
  • remove 72 tests from the pillar 4 total

The daily total for pillar 2 in-person tests is 1,491 higher, and for delivery routes is 177 lower, than the difference between today and yesterday’s cumulative totals. This is due to revisions to historical pillar 2 data following further information being made available to support data processing.

Testing capacity as of 2 June

At 9am on 2 June, testing capacity was 220,213.

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
Lab capacity 63,213 116,000 40,000 1,000 220,213


Dateline 2nd June 2020

As of 9am on 2 June, there have been 4,615,146 tests, with 135,643 tests on 1 June.

277,985 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 1 June, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 39,369 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 31,136.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 135,643 Unavailable 1,613 324
Total 4,615,146 Unavailable 277,985 39,369

Breakdown of testing by testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in Public Health England (PHE) labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars.

Read our testing methodology document about reporting statistics on testing.

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 20,669 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 29,998 69,605 30,357 5,683 135,643
Positive 528 1,085 - - 1,613

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,248,046 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 1,731,901 2,489,260 119,088 274,897 4,615,146
Positive 187,238 90,747 - - 277,985

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 24,847 44,758 69,605
Cumulative 1,209,249 1,280,011 2,489,260

Pillar 4 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 3,311 2,372 5,683
Cumulative 89,027 185,870 274,897

Dateline 1st June 2020
As of 9am on 1 June, there have been 4,484,340 tests, with 128,437 tests on 31 May.

276,332 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 31 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 39,045 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings not just in hospitals.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in all settings
Daily 128,437 Unavailable 1,570 111
Total 4,484,340 Unavailable 276,332 39,045

Breakdown of testing by 3 of the testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population, as set out in government guidance on testing
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 15,371 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 27,520 73,144 23,110 4,663 128,437
Positive 383 1,187 - - 1,570

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 3 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,227,377 Unavailable - - Unavailable
Tests 1,701,944 2,424,451 88,731 269,214 4,484,340
Positive 186,670 89,662 - - 276,332

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 29,414 43,730 73,144
Cumulative 1,189,776 1,234,675 2,424,451

Dateline 31st May 2020

As of 9am 31 May, there have been 4,285,738 tests, with 115,725 tests on 30 May.

274,762 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 30 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 38,489 have sadly died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 30,861.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 115,725 Unavailable 1,936 119 113
Total 4,285,738 Unavailable 274,762 30,861 38,489

Breakdown of testing by 3 of the testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population aged 5 and over, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 19,590 Unavailable - Unavailable
Tests 31,755 80,796 3,174 115,725
Positive 427 1,509 - 1,936

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,212,006 Unavailable - Unavailable
Tests 1,674,424 2,346,781 264,533 4,285,738
Positive 186,287 88,475 - 274,762

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 38,657 42,139 80,796
Cumulative 1,156,641 1,190,140 2,346,781

Dateline 30th May 2020

As of 9am on 30 May, there have been 4,171,408 tests, with 127,722 tests on 29 May.

272,826 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 29 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 38,376 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 30,742.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 127,722 Unavailable 2,445 178 215
Total 4,171,408 Unavailable 272,826 30,742 38,376

Breakdown of testing by 3 of the testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population aged 5 and over, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 20,819 Unavailable - Unavailable
Tests 37,085 85,417 5,220 127,722
Positive 869 1,576 - 2,445

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,192,416 Unavailable - Unavailable
Tests 1,642,666 2,267,383 261,359 4,171,408
Positive 185,860 86,966 - 272,826

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 40,959 44,458 85,417
Cumulative 1,122,989 1,144,394 2,267,383


Dateline 29th May 2020

As of 9am on 29 May, there have been 4,043,686 tests, with 131,458 tests on 28 May.

271,222 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 28 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 38,161 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 30,564.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 131,458 Unavailable 2,095 173 324
Total 4,043,686 Unavailable 271,222 30,564 38,161

Breakdown of testing by 3 of the testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population aged 5 and over, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 27,719 Unavailable - Unavailable
Tests 37,933 88,691 4,834 131,458
Positive 718 1,377 - 2,095

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,171,597 Unavailable - Unavailable
Tests 1,605,581 2,181,966 256,139 4,043,686
Positive 185,832 85,390 - 271,222

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 36,393 52,298 88,691
Cumulative 1,082,030 1,099,936 2,181,966

Dateline 28th May 2020

As of 9am on 28 May, there have been 3,918,079 tests, with 119,587 tests on 27 May.

269,127 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 27 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 37,837 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 30,391.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 119,587 Unavailable 1,887 214 377
Total 3,918,079 Unavailable 269,127 30,391 37,837

Breakdown of testing by 3 of the testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for the wider population aged 5 and over, as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 3: serology testing to show if people have antibodies from having had COVID-19
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 23,670 Unavailable - Unavailable
Tests 35,670 75,850 8,067 119,587
Positive 655 1,232 - 1,887

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,149,878 Unavailable - Unavailable
Tests 1,567,647 2,099,127 251,305 3,918,079
Positive 185,114 84,013 - 269,127

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 26,615 49,235 75,850
Cumulative 1,051,489 1,047,638 2,099,127

Dateline 27th May 2020

As of 9am on 27 May, there have been 3,798,490 tests, with 117,013 tests on 26 May.

1,126,208 people have been tested, of which 267,240 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 26 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 37,460 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 30,177.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 117,013 Unavailable 2,013 212 412
Total 3,798,490 Unavailable 267,240 30,177 37,460

Breakdown of testing by 3 of the testing strategy ‘pillars’

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 30,278 Unavailable - Unavailable
Tests 29,708 84,797 2,508 117,013
Positive 787 1,226 - 2,013

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,126,208 Unavailable - Unavailable
Tests 1,531,977 2,023,277 243,236 3,798,490
Positive 184,459 82,781 - 267,240

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 16,485 68,312 84,797
Cumulative 1,024,874 998,403 2,023,277

Testing capacity as of 27 May

As of 9am on 27 May, testing capacity was 161,214.

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
Lab capacity 54,164 106,000 1,050 161,214

Time series

See a time series of testing statistics (CSV, 37.9KB)

See a time series of capacity statistics (CSV, 7.37KB). This will be updated weekly from 31 May.

 

Dateline 26th May 2020

As of 9am on 26 May, there have been 3,681,295 tests, with 109,979 tests on 25 May.

265,227 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 25 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 37,048 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 29,965.

Number of tests Number of people tested Number of positive cases Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 109,979 Unavailable 2,004 135 134
Total 3,681,295 Unavailable 265,227 29,965 37,048

Breakdown of testing by 3 of the testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for essential workers and their households, as well as other groups that meet the eligibility criteria as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
Number of people tested 16,579 Unavailable - Unavailable
Number of tests 26,780 78,637 4,562 109,979
Number of positive cases 690 1,314 - 2,004

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
Number of people tested 1,095,930 Unavailable - Unavailable
Number of tests 1,502,093 1,938,480 240,722 3,681,295
Number of positive cases 183,672 81,555 - 265,227

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person routes (tests processed) Delivery routes (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 29,134 49,503 78,637
Cumulative 1,008,389 930,091 1,938,480

Dateline 25th May 2020
As of 9am on 25 May, there have been 3,532,634 tests, with 73,726 tests on 24 May.

261,184 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 24 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 36,914 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 29,830.

Number of tests Number of people tested Number of positive cases Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 73,726 Unavailable 1,625 76 121
Total 3,532,634 Unavailable 261,184 29,830 36,914

Breakdown of testing by 3 of the testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for essential workers and their households, as well as other groups that meet the eligibility criteria as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
Number of people tested 17,473 Unavailable - Unavailable
Number of tests 27,475 46,251 0 73,726
Number of positive cases 694 931 - 1,625

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
Number of people tested 1,079,351 Unavailable - Unavailable
Number of tests 1,475,312 1,823,616 233,706 3,532,634
Number of positive cases 182,982 78,202 - 261,184

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person routes (tests processed) Delivery routes (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 8,236 38,015 46,251
Cumulative 943,028 880,588 1,823,616

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars and ‘Notes on testing’ section below.

See a time series of daily deaths: 25 May 2020 (CSV, 3.33KB)

25 May notes

Due to technical difficulties with pillar 2 data collection we cannot provide people tested figures today.

Dateline 24th May 2020
As of 9am on 24 May, there have been 3,458,908 tests, with 110401 tests on 24 May.

259,559 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 23 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 36,793 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals.

Number of tests Number of people tested Number of positive cases Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily

110401

Unavailable 2405 n/a 118
Total 3,532,634 Unavailable 259559 n/a 36793

Breakdown of testing by 3 of the testing strategy ‘pillars’

  • Pillar 1: swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for essential workers and their households, as well as other groups that meet the eligibility criteria as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

 



Dateline 23rd May 2020

As of 9am 23 May, there have been 3,348,507 tests, with 116,585 tests on 22 May.

257,154 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 22 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 36,675 have sadly died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 29,583.

Number of tests Number of people tested Number of positive cases Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 116,585 Unavailable 2,959 190 282
Total 3,348,507 Unavailable 257,154 29,583 36,675

Breakdown of testing by 3 of the testing strategy ‘pillars’

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
Number of people tested Unavailable Unavailable - Unavailable
Number of tests 35,915 71,657 9,013 116,585
Number of positive cases 1,277 1,682 - 2,959

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
Number of people tested Unavailable Unavailable - Unavailable
Number of tests 1,415,607 1,702,527 230,373 3,348,507
Number of positive cases 181,479 75,675 - 257,154

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person routes (tests processed) Delivery routes (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 31,434 40,223 71,657
Cumulative 900,052 802,475 1,702,527
  • Pillar 1: swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for essential workers and their households, as well as other groups that meet the eligibility criteria as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

See the government’s national testing strategy for more information on the different pillars and ‘Notes on testing’ section below.

Dateline 22nd May 2020

As of 9am on 22 May, there have been 3,231,921 tests, with 140,497 tests on 21 May.

2,144,626 people have been tested, of which 254,195 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 21 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 36,393 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 29,393.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 140,497 80,297 3,287 172 351
Total 3,231,921 2,144,626 254,195 29,393 36,393

Breakdown of testing by 3 of the testing strategy ‘pillars’

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 24,627 55,670 - 80,297
Tests 37,728 90,301 12,468 140,497
Positive 1,357 1,930 - 3,287

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 1,017,448 1,127,178 - 2,144,626
Tests 1,379,691 1,630,870 221,360 3,231,921
Positive 180,202 73,993 - 254,195

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 47,243 43,058 90,301
Cumulative 868,618 762,252 1,630,870
  • Pillar 1: swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for essential workers and their households, as well as other groups that meet the eligibility criteria as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing


Dateline 21st May 2020



As of 9am on 21 May, there have been 3,090,566 tests, with 128,340 tests on 20 May.

2,064,329 people have been tested, of which 250,908 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 20 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 36,042 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 29,221.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 128,340 67,681 2,615 251 338
Total 3,090,566 2,064,329 250,908 29,221 36,042

Breakdown of testing by 3 of the testing strategy ‘pillars’

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 24,574 43,107 - 67,681
Tests 38,296 66,224 23,820 128,340
Positive 1,167 1,448 - 2,615

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 992,821 1,071,508 - 2,064,329
Tests 1,341,954 1,540,569 208,043 3,090,566
Positive 178,845 72,063 - 250,908

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 25,125 41,099 66,224
Cumulative 821,375 719,194 1,540,569
  • Pillar 1: swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for essential workers and their households, as well as other groups that meet the eligibility criteria as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing


Dateline 20th May 2020

As of 9am on 20 May, there have been 2,962,227 tests, with 177,216 tests on 19 May.

1,996,648 people have been tested, of which 248,293 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 19 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 35,704 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 28,970.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 177,216 60,744 2,472 216 363
Total 2,962,227 1,996,648 248,293 28,970 35,704

Breakdown of testing by 3 of the testing strategy ‘pillars’

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 16,287 44,457 - 60,744
Tests 35,196 118,419 23,601 177,216
Positive 1,048 1,424 - 2,472

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 968,247 1,028,401 - 1,996,648
Tests 1,303,659 1,474,345 184,223 2,962,227
Positive 177,678 70,615 - 248,293

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 38,041 80,378 118,419
Cumulative 796,250 678,095 1,474,345
  • Pillar 1: swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for essential workers and their households, as well as other groups that meet the eligibility criteria as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing


Dateline 19th May 2020

As of 9am on 19 May, there have been 2,772,552 tests, with 89,784 tests on 18 May.

248,818 people have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 18 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 35,341 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 28,754.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 89,784 Unavailable 2,412 199 545
Total 2,772,552 Unavailable 248,818 28,754 35,341

Breakdown of testing by 3 of the testing strategy ‘pillars’

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested Unavailable 34,193 - Unavailable
Tests 28,835 35,535 25,414 89,784
Positive 1,104 1,308 - 2,412

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested Unavailable 987,076 - Unavailable
Tests 1,273,612 1,338,409 160,531 2,772,552
Positive 177,022 71,796 - 248,818

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 8,019 27,516 35,535
Cumulative 740,692 597,717 1,338,409
  • Pillar 1: swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for essential workers and their households, as well as other groups that meet the eligibility criteria as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

Dateline 18th May 2020

As of 9am on 18 May, there have been 2,682,716 tests, with 100,678 tests on 17 May.

1,887,051 people have been tested, of which 246,406 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 17 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 34,796 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 28,555.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 100,678 67,409 2,684 138 160
Total 2,682,716 1,887,051 246,406 28,555 34,796

Breakdown of testing by 3 of the testing strategy ‘pillars’

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 16,865 50,544 - 67,409
Tests 24,746 73,895 2,037 100,678
Positive 990 1,694 - 2,684

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 934,168 952,883 - 1,887,051
Tests 1,244,725 1,302,874 135,117 2,682,716
Positive 175,918 70,488 - 246,406

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 45,822 28,073 73,895
Cumulative 732,673 570,201 1,302,874
  • Pillar 1: swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for essential workers and their households, as well as other groups that meet the eligibility criteria as set out in 

  • government guidance
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing


Dateline 17th May 2020

As of 9am on 17 May, there have been 2,580,769 tests, with 91,206 tests on 16 May.

1,818,712 people have been tested, of which 243,695 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 16 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 34,636 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 28,417.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 91,206 76,684 3,534 147 170
Total 2,580,769 1,818,712 243,695 28,417 34,636

Breakdown of testing by 3 of the testing strategy ‘pillars’

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 19,971 56,713 - 76,684
Tests 30,280 57,920 3,006 91,206
Positive 1,040 2,494 - 3,534

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 916,373 902,339 - 1,818,712
Tests 1,218,710 1,228,979 133,080 2,580,769
Positive 174,901 68,794 - 243,695

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 38,960 18,960 57,920
Cumulative 686,851 542,128 1,228,979
  • Pillar 1: swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for essential workers and their households, as well as other groups that meet the eligibility criteria as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

 

Latest Daily Reports on spread

Now you can track the increase per day and the county by county spread every day by

By Clicking here

Dateline 15th May 2020

As of 9am on 15 May, there have been 2,353,078 tests, with 133,784 tests on 14 May.

1,663,492 people have been tested, of which 236,711 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 14 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 33,998 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 28,010.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 133,784 69,590 3,560 234 384
Total 2,353,078 1,663,492 236,711 28,010 33,998

Breakdown of testing by 3 of the testing strategy ‘pillars’

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 20,202 49,388 - 69,590
Tests 32,207 74,487 27,090 133,784
Positive 1,407 2,153 - 3,560

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 868,588 794,904 - 1,663,492
Tests 1,151,107 1,103,244 98,727 2,353,078
Positive 172,316 64,395 - 236,711

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 33,760 40,727 74,487
Cumulative 615,315 487,929 1,103,244
  • Pillar 1: swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for essential workers and their households, as well as other groups that meet the eligibility criteria as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing


Dateline 14th May 2020

As of 9am on 14 May, there have been 2,219,281 tests, with 126,064 tests on 13 May.

1,593,902 people have been tested, of which 233,151 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 13 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 33,614 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 27,776.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 126,064 71,644 3,446 280 428
Total 2,219,281 1,593,902 233,151 27,776 33,614

Breakdown of testing by 3 of the testing strategy ‘pillars’

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 22,759 48,885 - 71,644
Tests 31,828 72,512 21,724 126,064
Positive 1,543 1,903 - 3,446

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 848,386 745,516 - 1,593,902
Tests 1,118,887 1,028,757 71,637 2,219,281
Positive 170,909 62,242 - 233,151

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 28,233 44,279 72,512
Cumulative 581,555 447,202 1,028,757
  • Pillar 1: swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for essential workers and their households, as well as other groups that meet the eligibility criteria as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing


Dateline 13th May 2020

As of 9am on 13 May, there have been 2,094,209 tests, with 87,063 tests on 12 May.

1,522,258 people have been tested, of which 229,705 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 12 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 33,186 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 27,496.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 87,063 61,741 3,242 325 494
Total 2,094,209 1,522,258 229,705 27,496 33,186

Breakdown of testing by 3 of the testing strategy ‘pillars’

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 21,450 40,291 - 61,741
Tests 32,077 48,967 6,019 87,063
Positive 1,505 1,737 - 3,242

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 825,627 696,631 - 1,522,258
Tests 1,086,365 956,245 51,599 2,094,209
Positive 169,366 60,339 - 229,705

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 15,292 33,675 48,967
Cumulative 553,322 402,923 956,245
  • Pillar 1: swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for essential workers and their households, as well as other groups that meet the eligibility criteria as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing


Dateline 12th May 2020

As of 9am on 12 May, there have been 2,007,146 tests, with 85,293 tests on 11 May.

1,460,517 people have been tested, of which 226,463 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 11 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 32,692 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 27,171.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 85,293 60,410 3,403 374 627
Total 2,007,146 1,460,517 226,463 27,171 32,692

Breakdown of testing by 3 of the testing strategy ‘pillars’

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 18,756 41,654 - 60,410
Tests 25,462 54,342 5,489 85,293
Positive 1,352 2,051 - 3,403

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 804,177 656,340 - 1,460,517
Tests 1,054,288 907,278 45,580 2,007,146
Positive 167,861 58,602 - 226,463

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 26,052 28,290 54,342
Cumulative 538,030 369,248 907,278
  • Pillar 1: swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for essential workers and their households, as well as other groups that meet the eligibility criteria as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing


Dateline 11th May 2020

As of 9am on 11 May, there have been 1,921,770 tests, with 100,490 tests on 10 May.

1,400,107 people have been tested, of which 223,060 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 10 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 32,065 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 26,797.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 100,490 65,337 3,877 229 210
Total 1,921,770 1,400,107 223,060 26,797 32,065

See below for an explanation of why the daily figure for deaths in hospitals can be higher than the daily figure for deaths in all settings.

Breakdown of testing by 3 of the testing strategy ‘pillars’

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 18,123 47,214 - 65,337
Tests 26,327 71,480 2,683 100,490
Positive 1,186 2,691 - 3,877

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 785,421 614,686 - 1,400,107
Tests 1,028,743 852,936 40,091 1,921,770
Positive 166,509 56,551 - 223,060

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 43,265 28,215 71,480
Cumulative 511,978 340,958 852,936
  • Pillar 1: swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for essential workers and their households, as well as other groups that meet the eligibility criteria as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing

Dateline 10th May 2020
As of 9am on 10 May, there have been 1,821,280 tests, with 92,837 tests on 9 May.

1,334,770 people have been tested, of which 219,183 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 9 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 31,855 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 26,568.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 92,837 64,362 3,923 230 269
Total 1,821,280 1,334,770 219,183 26,568 31,855

Breakdown of testing by 3 of the testing strategy ‘pillars’

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 18,188 46,174 - 64,362
Tests 28,412 62,653 1,772 92,837
Positive 1,452 2,471 - 3,923

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 767,298 567,472 - 1,334,770
Tests 1,002,416 781,456 37,408 1,821,280
Positive 165,323 53,860 - 219,183

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 38,852 23,801 62,653
Cumulative 468,713 312,743 781,456
  • Pillar 1: swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for essential workers and their households, as well as other groups that meet the eligibility criteria as set out in government guidance

Dateline 9th May 2020
As of 9am 9 May, there have been 1,728,443 tests, with 96,878 tests on 8 May.

1,270,408 people have been tested, of which 215,260 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 8 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 31,587 have sadly died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 26,339.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 96,878 63,339 3,896 270 346
Total 1,728,443 1,270,408 215,260 26,339 31,587

Breakdown of testing by 3 of the testing strategy ‘pillars’

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 20,995 42,344 - 63,339
Tests 32,492 62,396 1,990 96,878
Positive 1,679 2,217 - 3,896

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 749,110 521,298 - 1,270,408
Tests 974,004 718,803 35,636 1,728,443
Positive 163,871 51,389 - 215,260

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 26,721 35,675 62,396
Cumulative 429,861 288,942 718,803
  • Pillar 1: swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for essential workers and their households, as well as other groups that meet the eligibility criteria as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHEONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing
Dateline 8th May 2020


As of 9am on 8 May, there have been 1,534,533 tests. There were 86,583 tests on 6 May.

1,139,626 people have been tested and 206,715 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 6 May, of those who tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 30,615 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 25,646.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily     n./a 423 626
Total       26069 31241


Dateline 7th May 2020
Now showing progress on Pillar Goals

As of 9am on 7 May, there have been 1,534,533 tests. There were 86,583 tests on 6 May.

1,139,626 people have been tested and 206,715 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 6 May, of those who tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 30,615 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 25,646.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 86,583 65,092 5,614 498 539
Total 1,534,533 1,139,626 206,715 25,646 30,615

Breakdown of testing by 3 of the testing strategy ‘pillars’

Daily

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 24,482 40,610 - 65,092
Tests 32,667 49,882 4,034 86,583
Positive 2,485 3,129 - 5,614

Cumulative

Pillar 1 Pillar 2 Pillar 4 Total
People tested 703,825 435,801 - 1,139,626
Tests 907,921 597,237 29,375 1,534,533
Positive 160,083 46,632 - 206,715

Pillar 2 breakdown of test types

In-person (tests processed) Delivery (tests sent out) Total tests
Daily 32,335 17,547 49,882
Cumulative 387,857 209,380 597,237
  • Pillar 1: swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a clinical need, and health and care workers
  • Pillar 2: swab testing for essential workers and their households, as well as other groups that meet the eligibility criteria as set out in government guidance
  • Pillar 4: serology and swab testing for national surveillance supported by PHE, ONS, Biobank, universities and other partners to learn more about the prevalence and spread of the virus and for other testing research purposes, for example on the accuracy and ease of use of home testing



Dateline 6th May 2020


As of 9am 6 May, there have been 1,448,010 tests. There were 69,463 tests on 5 May.

1,072,144 people have been tested and 201,101 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 5 May, of those who tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 30,076 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 25,148.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 69,463 57,006 6,111 413 649
Total 1,448,010 1,072,144 201,101 25,148 30,076


Dateline 5th May 2020


As of 9am on 5 May, there have been 1,383,842 tests, with 84,806 tests on 4 May.

1,015,138 people have been tested, of whom 194,990 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 4 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 29,427 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 24,735.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 84,806 69,839 4,406 403 693
Total 1,383,842 1,015,138 194,990 24,735 29,427


Dateline 4th May 2020


As of 9am on 4 May, there have been 1,291,591 tests, with 85,186 tests on 3 May.

945,299 people have been tested, of whom 190,584 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 3 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 28,734 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 24,332.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 85,186 62,956 3,985 235 288
Total 1,291,591 945,299 190,584 24,332 28,734


Dateline 3rd May 2020


As of 9am on 3 May, there have been 1,206,405 tests, with 76,496 tests on 2 May.

882,343 people have been tested of which 186,599 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 2 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 28,446 have sadly died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 24,097.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths in hospitals Deaths in all settings
Daily 76,496 56,397 4,339 396 315
Total 1,206,405 882,343 186,599 24,097 28,446

Dateline 2nd May 2020

As of 9am on 2 May, there have been 1,129,907 tests, with 105,937 tests on 1 May.

825,946 people have been tested of which 182,260 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 1 May, of those tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 28,131 have sadly died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 23,701.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 105,937 63,667 4,806 621
Total 1,129,907 825,946 182,260 28,131


Dateline 1st May 2020


As of 9am on 1 May, there have been 1,023,824 tests, with 122,347 tests on 30 April.

762,279 people have been tested, of whom 177,454 have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 30 April, of those who tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 27,510 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 23,229.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 122,347 73,191 6,201 739
Total 1,023,824 762,279 177,454 27,510


Dateline 30th April 2020


As of 9am on 30 April, there have been 901,905 tests, with 81,611 tests on 29 April.

687,369 people have been tested, of whom 171,253 have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 29 April, of those who tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, 26,771 have died. This new figure includes deaths in all settings, not just in hospitals. The equivalent figure under the old measure would have been 22,791.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 81,611 54,575 6,032 674
Total 901,905 687,369 171,253 26,771


Dateline 29th April 2020



As of 9am on 28 April, there have been 763,387 tests, with 43,563 tests on 27 April.

599,339 people have been tested, of whom 161,145 have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 27 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 21,678 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 43,563 29,571 3,996 586
Total 763,387 599,339 161,145 21,678


Dateline 28th April 2020


As of 9am on 28 April, there have been 763,387 tests, with 43,563 tests on 27 April.

599,339 people have been tested, of whom 161,145 have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 27 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 21,678 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 43,563 29,571 3,996 586
Total 763,387 599,339 161,145 21,678


Dateline 27th April 2020


As of 9am on 27 April, there have been 719,910 tests, with 37,024 tests on 26 April.

569,768 people have been tested, of whom 157,149 have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 26 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 21,092 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 37,024 26,355 4,310 360
Total 719,910 569,768 157,149 21,092

Dateline 26th April 2020

As of 9am on 26 April, 669,850 tests have concluded, with 29,058 tests carried out on 25 April.

543,413 people have been tested, of whom 152,840 have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 25 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 20,732 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 29,058 25,577 4,463 413
Total 669,850 543,413 152,840 20,732


Dateline 25th April 2020


As of 9am on 25 April, 640,792 tests have concluded, with 28,760 tests carried out on 24 April.

517,836 people have been tested, of whom 148,377 have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 24 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 20,319 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 28,760 23,115 4,913 813
Total 640,792 517,836 148,377 20,319

Dateline 24th April 2020

As of 9am on 24 April, 612,031 tests have concluded, with 28,532 tests carried out on 23 April.

444,222 people have been tested, of whom 143,464 have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 23 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 19,506 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 28,532 18,401 5,386 684
Total 612,031 444,222 143,464 19,506

Dateline 23rd April 2020

As of 9am on 23 April, 583,496 tests have concluded, with 23,560 tests carried out on 22 April.

425,821 people have been tested, of whom 138,078 have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 22 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 18,738 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 23,560 14,629 4,583 616
Total 583,496 425,821 138,078 18,738

Dateline 22nd April 2020

As of 9am 22 April, 559,935 tests have concluded, with 22,814 tests carried out on 21 April.

411,192 people have been tested, of whom 133,495 have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 21 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 18,100 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 22,814 13,522 4,451 759
Total 559,935 411,192 133,495 18,100

Dateline 21st April 2020

As of 9am 21 April, 535,342 tests have concluded, with 18,206 tests carried out on 20 April.

397,670 people have been tested, of whom 129,044 have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 20 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 17,337 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 18,206 11,626 4,301 823
Total 535,342 397,670 129,044 17,337

 

Dateline 20th April 2020

As of 9am 20 April, 501,379 tests have concluded, with 19,316 tests carried out on 19 April.

386,044 people have been tested, of whom 124,743 have tested positive.

As of 5pm on 20 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 16,509 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 19,316 14,106 4,676 449
Total 501,379 386,044 124,743 16,509

Dateline 19th April 2020
As of 9am 19 April, 482,063 tests have concluded, with 21,626 tests on 18 April.

372,967 people have been tested of which 120,067 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 18 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 16,060 have sadly died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 21,626 15,944 5,850 596
Total 482,063 372,967 120,067 16,060


Dateline 18th April 2020

As of 9am 18 April, 460,437 tests have concluded, with 21,389 tests on 17 April.

357,023 people have been tested of which 114,217 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 17 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 15,464 have sadly died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 21,389 15,472 5,526 888
Total 460,437 357,023 114,217 15,464


Dateline 17th April 2020

As of 9am on 17 April, 438,991 tests have concluded, with 21,328 tests carried out on 16 April.

341,551 people have been tested, of whom 108,692 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 16 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 14,576 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 21,328 13,943 5,599 847
Total 438,991 341,551 108,692 14,576


Dateline 16th April 2020

As of 9am on 16 April,417,649 tests have concluded, with 18,665 tests carried out on 15 April.

327,608 people have been tested, of whom 103,093 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 15 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 13,729 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 18,665 13,839 4,618 861
Total 417,649 327,608 103,093 13,729

Dateline 15th April 2020

As of 9am on 15 April, 398,916 tests have concluded, with 15,994 tests carried out on 14 April.

313,769 people have been tested, of whom 98,476 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 14 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 12,868 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 15,994 11,170 4,605 761
Total 398,916 313,769 98,476 12,868

Dateline 14th April 2020

As of 9am on 14 April, 382,650 tests have concluded, with 14,982 tests carried out on 13 April.

302,599 people have been tested, of whom 93,873 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 13 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 12,107 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 14,982 11,879 5,252 778
Total 382,650 302,599 93,873 12,107

Dateline 13th April 2020

As of 9am on 13 April, 367,667 tests have concluded, with 14,506 tests carried out on 12 April.

290,720 people have been tested, of whom 88,621 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 12 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 11,329 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 14,506 10,745 4,342 717
Total 367,667 290,720 88,621 11,329

Dateline 12th April 2020

As of 9am on 12 April, 352,974 tests have concluded, with 18,000 tests carried out on 11 April.

282,374 people have been tested, of whom 84,279 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 11 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 10,621 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 18,000 12,776 5,288 737
Total 352,974 282,374 84,279 10,621

Some individuals are tested more than once for clinical reasons. The figure for the number of tests excludes data from Northern Ireland. Testing data reflects the latest reported data although the timing of reporting cycles

Dateline 11th April 2020

As of 9am on 11 April, 334,974 tests have concluded across the UK, with 18,091 tests carried out on 10 April.

269,598 people have been tested, of whom 78,991 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 10 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 9,875 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 18,091 12,993 5,234 917
Total 334,974 269,598 78,991 9,875

Dateline 10th April 2020

As of 9am on 10 April, 316,836 tests have concluded across the UK, with 19,116 tests carried out on 9 April. Some individuals are tested more than once for clinical reasons.

256,605 people have been tested, of whom 73,758 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 9 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 8,958 have died.

Tests People tested Positive results Deaths
Daily 19,116 13,543 5,706 980
Total 316,836 256,605 73,758 8,958

Incorporating figures on swab testing for critical key workers

Dateline 9th April 2020

As of 9am on 9 April, 298,169 tests have concluded across the UK, with 16,095 tests carried out on 8 April. Some individuals are tested more than once for clinical reasons.


243,421 people have been tested, of whom 65,077 tested positive. The tests concluded figure excludes data from Northern Ireland.

As of 5pm on 8 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 7,978 have died.

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 16,095 10,713 4,344 881
Total 298,169 243,421 65,077 7,978

Data on UK positive and negative tests and data on deaths is updated on this

Dateline 8th April 2020

As of 9am on 8 April, 282,074 tests have concluded across the UK, with 14,682 tests carried out on 7 April. Some individuals are tested more than once for clinical reasons.

232,708 people have been tested, of whom 60,773 tested positive. Today’s figure for test data does not include Charing Cross and Southampton due to a data processing delay. The tests concluded figure excludes data from Northern Ireland.

As of 5pm on 7 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 7,097 have died. Increase of 938 from yesterday.

 

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 14,682 12,959 5,492 938
Total 282,074 232,708 60,733 7,097

Dateline 7th April 2020

As of 9am on 7 April, 266,694 tests have concluded across the UK, with 14,006 tests carried out on 6 April. Some individuals are tested more than once for clinical reasons.

213,181 people have been tested, of whom 55,242 tested positive. Today’s figure for people tested does not include Manchester and Leeds due to a data processing delay. The tests concluded figure excludes data from Northern Ireland.

As of 5pm on 6 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 6,159 have died.Increase of 786 from yesterday.

Dateline 6th April 2020

As of 9am 6 April, 252,958 tests have concluded, with 13,069 tests carried out on 5 April (this does not include data for Northern Ireland). Some individuals are tested more than once for clinical reasons.

208,837 people have been tested, of whom 51,608 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 5 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 5,373 have died. Increase of 439 from yesterday.

Dateline 5th April 2020

As of 9am on 5 April 2020, 195,524 people have been tested, of which 47,806 were confirmed positive.

As of 5pm on 4 April 2020, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 4,934 have died. Increase of 621 from yesterday.

Data on UK positive and negative tests and data on deaths is updated on this page daily at 2pm or shortly after. The figures for test results and for deaths are compiled from different sources. This is why the figures for deaths are reported from an earlier point in time than the figures for test results.

Dateline 4th April 2020

As of 9am on 4 April 2020, 183,190 people have been tested, of which 41,903 were confirmed positive.

As of 5pm on 3 April 2020, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 4,313 have died.Increase of 708 from yesterday.

Data on UK positive and negative tests and data on deaths is updated on this page daily at 2pm or shortly after. The figures for test results and for deaths are compiled from different sources. This is why the figures for deaths are reported from an earlier point in time than the figures for test results.

Dateline 3rd April 2020

As of 9am on 3 April 2020, 173,784 people have been tested, of which 38,168 were confirmed positive.

As of 5pm on 2 April 2020, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 3,605 have died. Increase of 684 from yesterday.

Data on UK positive and negative tests and data on deaths is updated on this page daily at 2pm or shortly after. The figures for test results and for deaths are compiled from different sources. This is why the figures for deaths are reported from an earlier point in time than the figures for test results.

Dateline 2nd April 2020
As of 9am on 2 April 2020, 163,194 people have been tested, of which 33,718 were confirmed positive.

As of 5pm on 1 April 2020, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 2,921 have died.

Data on UK positive and negative tests and data on deaths is updated on this page daily. The figures for test results and for deaths are compiled from different sources. This is why the figures for deaths are reported from an earlier point in time than the figures for test results.

Dateline 1st April 2020

As of 9am on 1 April 2020, 152,979 people have been tested, of which 29,474 were confirmed positive.

As of 5pm on 31 March 2020, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 2,352 have died.

Data on UK positive and negative tests and data on deaths is updated on this page daily. The figures for test results and for deaths are compiled from different sources. This is why the figures for deaths are reported from an earlier point in time than the figures for test results.

Dateline 31st March 2020

As of 9am on 31 March 2020, a total of 143,186 people have been tested, of which 25,150 were confirmed positive.

As of 5pm on 30 March 2020, of those hospitalised in the UK, 1,789 have died.

The figures for test results and for deaths are compiled from different sources. This is why the figures for deaths are reported from an earlier point in time than the figures for test results.


Dateline 30th March 2020

As of 9am on 30 March 2020, a total of 134,946 people have been tested, of which 112,805 were confirmed negative and 22,141 were confirmed positive.

As of 5pm on 29 March 2020, 1,408 patients in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) have died.

The figures for test results and for deaths are compiled from different sources. This is why the figures for deaths are reported from an earlier point in time than the figures for test results.

Dateline 29th March 2020

As of 9am on 29 March 2020, a total of 127,737 people have been tested, of which 108,215 were confirmed negative and 19,522 were confirmed positive.

As of 5pm on 28 March 2020, 1,228 patients in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) have died.

The figures for test results and for deaths are compiled from different sources. This is why the figures for deaths are reported from an earlier point in time than the figures for test results.


Dateline 28th March 2020

As of 9am on 28 March 2020, a total of 120,776 people have been tested, of which 103,687 were confirmed negative and 17,089 were confirmed positive.

As of 5pm on 27 March 2020, 1,019 patients in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) have died.

The figures for test results and for deaths are compiled from different sources. This is why the figures for deaths are reported from an earlier point in time than the figures for test results.

Dateline 27th March 2020

As of 9am on 27 March 2020, a total of 113,777 people have been tested, of which 99,234 were confirmed negative and 14,543 were confirmed positive.

As of 5pm on 26 March 2020, 759 patients in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) have died.

The figures for test results and for deaths are compiled from different sources. This is why the figures for deaths are reported from an earlier point in time than the figures for test results.

Dateline 26th March 2020

As of 9am on 26 March 2020, a total of 104,866 people have been tested, of which 93,208 were confirmed negative and 11,658 were confirmed positive.

As of 5pm on 25 March 2020, 578 patients in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) have died.

Dateline 25th March 2020

As of 9am on 25 March 2020, a total of 97,019 people have been tested, of which 87,490 were confirmed negative and 9,529 were confirmed positive. 463 patients in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) have died.

Dateline 24th March 2020

As of 9am on 24 March 2020, a total of 90,436 people have been tested, of which 82,359 were confirmed negative and 8,077 were confirmed positive. 422 patients in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) have died.

Dateline 23rd March 2020


As of 9am on 23 March 2020, a total of 83,945 people have been tested, of which 77,295 were confirmed negative and 6,650 were confirmed positive.

As of 1pm on 23 March 2020, 335 patients in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) have died.

Dateline 21st March 2020

As of 9am on 21 March 2020, 72,818 people have been tested in the UK, of which 67,800 were confirmed negative and 5,018 were confirmed positive.

As of 9am, 233 patients in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) have died.

Dateline 20th March 2020

As of 9am on 20 March 2020, 66,976 people have been tested in the UK, of which 62,993 were confirmed negative and 3,983 were confirmed positive.

As of 1pm, 177 patients in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) have died.

Dateline 19th March 2020

As of 9am on 19 March 2020, 64,621 people have been tested in the UK, of which 61,352 were confirmed negative and 3,269 were confirmed positive. As of 1pm 144 patients in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) have died.

Dateline 18th March 2020

As of 9am on 18 March 2020, 56,221 people have been tested in the UK, of which 53,595 were confirmed negative and 2,626 were confirmed positive. 103 patients in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) have died.

Dateline 17th March

As of 9am on 17 March 2020, 50,442 people have been tested in the UK, of which 48,492 were confirmed negative and 1,950 were confirmed as positive. The latest confirmed number of deaths will be announced later today.

Reports are sporadic dependent on change but we missed yesterday as our IT suffered a glitch apologies.

 

Dateline 14.03.20

As of 9am on 14 March 2020, 37,746 people have been tested in the UK, of which 36,606 were confirmed negative and 1,140 were confirmed as positive. 21 patients who tested positive for COVID-19 have died.

Dateline 13.03.20

As of 9am on 13 March 2020, 32,771 people have been tested in the UK, of which 31,973 were confirmed negative and 798 were confirmed as positive. 10 patients who tested positive for COVID-19 have died.

Cases identified in England

Confirmed cases in each local authority and NHS region are published by Public Health England (PHE).

Risk level

The risk to the UK has been raised to high.

 

 

 

Dateline 12.03.20

As of 9am on 12 March 2020, 29,764 people have been tested in the UK, of which 29,174 were confirmed negative and 590 were confirmed as positive. Eight patients who tested positive for COVID-19 have died.

Cases in England

NHS region Cases


East of England 32
London 136
Midlands 44
North East and Yorkshire 44
North West 53
South East 83
South West 42
To be determined 57
Total 491

Confirmed cases in each local authority and NHS region are published by Public Health England (PHE).

Dateline 11.03.20

As of 9am on 11 March 2020, 27,476 people have been tested in the UK, of which 27,020 were confirmed negative and 456 were confirmed as positive.

Six patients who tested positive for COVID-19 have died.

NHS region Cases Breakdown

East of England 32
London 104
Midlands 42
North East and Yorkshire 32
North West 43
South East 60
South West 44
To be determined 30

Total 387

Dateline 10.03.20

Number of cases
As of 9am on 10 March 2020, 26,261 people have been tested in the UK, of which 25,888 were confirmed negative and 373 were confirmed as positive.

Six patients who tested positive for COVID-19 have died.

NHS region: Cases: Last Breakdown

East of England 29
London 91
Midlands 36
North East and Yorkshire 24
North West 37
South East 51
South West 41
To be determined 15
Total 324

Dateline 09.03.20

As of 9am this morning just under 300 cases in the UK have tested positive for COVID-19.

23000 people have been tested, with 280 testing positive and 3 dying.

Government decided to remain at "Containment Phase"

NHS region Cases

East of England 24

London 61

Midlands 31

North East and Yorkshire 22

North West 35

South East 43

South West 38

To be determined 26

Total 280

Dateline 05.03.20

As of 9am this morning 25 further patients in England have tested positive for COVID-19.

Seventeen were diagnosed who had recently travelled from recognised countries or from recognised clusters which were under investigation. Eight patients were identified in the UK where it is not yet clear whether they contracted it directly or indirectly from an individual who had recently returned from abroad. This is being investigated and contact tracing has begun.

The total number of confirmed cases in England is now 105. Following previously reported confirmed cases in Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland, the total number of UK cases is 115.

All 7 NHS England regions are now reporting on cases of COVID-19. From tomorrow, 6 March 2020, Public Health England will start reporting on upper-tier local authority cases.

Dateline 04.03.20

CMO for England announces 32 new cases of novel corona-virus: 4 March 2020
Chief Medical Officer (CMO) Professor Chris Whitty statement on 32 new cases of COVID-19.

Optrafair logo
Professor Chris Whitty, CMO for England, said:

As of 9am this morning 32 further patients in England have tested positive for COVID-19.

Twenty-nine patients were diagnosed who had recently travelled from recognised countries or from recognised clusters which were under investigation.

Three additional patients contracted the virus in the UK and it is not yet clear whether they contracted it directly or indirectly from an individual who had recently returned from abroad. This is being investigated and contact tracing has begun.


The total number of confirmed cases in England is now 80. Following previously reported confirmed cases in Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland, the total number of UK cases is 85.

As of today, due to the number of new cases, we will no longer be publishing information on the location of each new case.

Instead, this information will be published in a consolidated format once a week. This will be published on Friday. Regions will continue to be told as and when they have confirmed cases.


Regulators of Health Providers define how Covid-19 will affect their role
What Travellers returning should do and how primary care facilities should deal with them
Possible contamination in practce, deep clean?


Covid -19 So what is it:


Coronavirus (COVID-19) is a new strain of coronavirus first identified in Wuhan City, China in December 2019.
Public Health England is working to contact anyone who has been in close contact with people who have coronavirus.


 

Regulators of Health Providers define how Covid-19 will affect their role

How we will continue to regulate in light of novel coronavirus (COVID-19)?


We understand that as health and care professionals you may be feeling anxious about novel coronavirus (COVID-19). Across the UK, public health organisations, government health officials and employers are putting in place plans to ensure that people receive the right advice, care and support and that you have the best information, environment and equipment to do your job.

Health and care professionals will play a vital role in helping to treat and contain coronavirus and we recognise that should the virus spread further, health and care professionals are likely to face an increased burden in helping the UK through the outbreak. It’s important that during this time everyone follows national public health advice and guidance.

We also recognise that health and care professionals may have understandable concerns about decisions they may need to take in order to provide the best care in challenging circumstances. Together, as professional regulators across the UK, we have prepared a joint statement on how we will carry out our roles during this time.

Joint statement from Chief Executives of statutory regulators of health and care professionals

We hold the registers of health and care professionals in the UK. We support those professionals to deliver better, safer care by setting the standards they need to meet, to act in the best interests of patients and people who use health and social care services at all times.

As registered professionals, the first concern of the individuals on our registers will be the care of their patients and people who use health and social care services. We encourage health and care professionals, working in partnership with each other and people using services, to use their professional judgement to assess risk to deliver safe care informed by any relevant guidance and the values and principles set out in their professional standards.

We recognise that in highly challenging circumstances, professionals may need to depart from established procedures in order to care for patients and people using health and social care services. Our regulatory standards are designed to be flexible and to provide a framework for decision-making in a wide range of situations. They support professionals by highlighting the key principles which should be followed, including the need to work cooperatively with colleagues to keep people safe, to practise in line with the best available evidence, to recognise and work within the limits of their competence, and to have appropriate indemnity arrangements relevant to their practice.

We recognise that the individuals on our registers may feel anxious about how context is taken into account when concerns are raised about their decisions and actions in very challenging circumstances. Where a concern is raised about a registered professional, it will always be considered on the specific facts of the case, taking into account the factors relevant to the environment in which the professional is working. We would also take account of any relevant information about resource, guidelines or protocols in place at the time.

We may issue profession specific guidance to registrants to provide additional support where that is needed.

The statutory health and care regulators that have agreed to this statement are:

General Chiropractic Council
General Dental Council
General Medical Council
General Optical Council
General Osteopathic Council
General Pharmaceutical Council
Health and Care Professions Council
Nursing and Midwifery Council
Pharmaceutical Society of Northern Ireland
Scottish Social Services Council
Social Work England

Advice for returning travellers

March 9th

Returning travellers

Stay indoors and avoid contact with other people if you’ve travelled to the UK from the following places in the last 14 days, even if you do not have symptoms:

Iran
Hubei province in China
lockdown areas in northern Italy:

Lombardy region (which includes the cities of Milan, Bergamo, Como) and the provinces of Modena, Parma, Piacenza, Reggio Emilia and Rimini (all in Emilia Romagna); Pesaro e Urbino (in Marche); Alessandria, Asti, Novara, Verbano-Cusio-Ossola and Vercelli (all in Piemonte); Padova. Treviso and Venice (in Veneto).

special care zones in South Korea
Daegu
Cheongdo

Stay indoors and avoid contact with other people if you’ve travelled to the UK from the following places in the last 14 days and have a cough, high temperature or shortness of breath, even if your symptoms are mild:

mainland China outside of Hubei province
Italy outside of the lockdown areas
South Korea outside of the special care zones
Cambodia
Hong Kong
Japan
Laos
Macau
Malaysia
Myanmar
Singapore
Taiwan
Thailand
Vietnam


Use the 111 online coronavirus service to find out what to do next.

Do not go to a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital or primary care facilities including opticians and dentists.

In Scotland call your GP or NHS 24 on 111 out of hours.

In Wales call 111 (if available in your area) or 0845 46 47.

In Northern Ireland call 111.

 

Read the latest information about the situation in the UK, along with guidance for what to do if you think you’re at risk.


Go to NHSUK/coronavirus for information about the virus and how to protect yourself.

Use the 111 online coronavirus service to check if you need medical help.

The government has published its coronavirus action plan and expanded its public information campaign.

Read Public Health England’s blog posts about its response to coronavirus and how it uses contact tracing to prevent the spread of infection.

We remind all primary care practices of the Government's Interim Advice on dealing with Covid-19

1. Main principles

Identify potential cases as soon as possible

prevent potential transmission of infection to other patients and staff

avoid direct physical contact, including physical examination, and exposures to respiratory secretions

isolate the patient, obtain specialist advice and determine if the patient is at risk of COVID-19

Currently, if COVID-19 infection is seen in the UK, it is most likely to occur in travelers who have recently returned from specified countries and areas. Therefore, an accurate travel history is an important part of identifying potential risk. See Public Heath England’s (PHE’s) guidance for assessing possible cases.

2. Actions to take

Patients booking in by telephone or online who meet the case definition should be directed to NHS 111.

An unwell patient with a relevant travel history should be identified when they book in at reception and immediately placed in a room away from other patients and staff. If COVID-19 is considered possible when a consultation is already in progress, withdraw from the room, close the door and wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water.

Avoid physical examination of a suspected case.

The patient should remain in the room with the door closed. Belongings and waste should remain in the room. The patient and any accompanying family should remain in the room with the door closed.

Advise others not to enter the room.

If a clinical history still needs to be obtained or completed, do this by telephone.

If entry to the room or contact with the patient is unavoidable in an emergency, wear personal protective equipment (PPE) in line with standard infection control precautions, such as gloves, apron and fluid resistant surgical mask (FRSM) and keep exposure to a minimum. All PPE in full should be disposed of as clinical waste.

Should the patient need to use the toilet, they should be allocated a WC for their sole use. Instruct the patient to wash their hands thoroughly after toileting, and return directly to the room they have been isolated in and close the door. The toilet should be taken out of use until cleaned and disinfected following the decontamination guidance.

Ask the patient to call NHS 111 from their room, on their mobile (use GP surgery landline if mobile unavailable).

When a telephone interview is being conducted with a patient located elsewhere (for example at home) and it is determined that COVID-19 is possible (based on the PHE criteria for a possible case), then a face-to-face assessment in primary care (including out-of-hours centres and GP hubs) must be avoided. Instead, call the local secondary care infection specialist to discuss safe assessment, if hospital care is being considered, if not refer to NHS 111.

3. Patient transfers

If the patient is critically ill and requires an urgent ambulance transfer to a hospital, inform the ambulance call handler of the concerns about COVID-19.

In all other instances, the case must be discussed with the hospital first so that they are aware that COVID-19 is being considered and the method of transport to secondary care agreed.

Patients with suspected COVID-19 should be instructed not to use public transport or taxis to get to hospital.

Following the patient transfer, the room should be closed and should not be used until further advice is provided by the local HPT.

4. Environmental cleaning following a possible case

Once a possible case has been transferred from the primary care premises, the room where the patient was placed should not be used, the room door should remain shut, with windows opened and the air conditioning switched off, until it has been cleaned with detergent and disinfectant. Once this process has been completed, the room can be put back in use immediately.

4.1 Preparation

The responsible person undertaking the cleaning with detergent and disinfectant should be familiar with these processes and procedures:
collect all cleaning equipment and clinical waste bags before entering the room
any cloths and mop heads used must be disposed of as single use items
before entering the room, perform hand hygiene then put on a disposable plastic apron and gloves

4.2 On entering the room

Keep the door closed with windows open to improve airflow and ventilation whilst using detergent and disinfection products

Bag all items that have been used for the care of the patient as clinical waste, for example, contents of the waste bin and any consumables that cannot be cleaned with detergent and disinfectant
remove any fabric curtains or screens and bag as infectious linen

Close any sharps containers wiping the surfaces with either a combined detergent disinfectant solution at a dilution of 1000 parts per million (ppm) available chlorine (av.cl.) or a neutral purpose detergent followed by disinfection (1000 ppm av.cl.)

4.3 Cleaning process

Use disposable cloths or paper roll or disposable mop heads, to clean and disinfect all hard surfaces or floor or chairs or door handles or reusable non-invasive care equipment or sanitary fittings in the room, following one of the 2 options below:

use either a combined detergent disinfectant solution at a dilution of 1000 parts per million (ppm) available chlorine (av.cl.) or a neutral purpose detergent followed by disinfection (1000 ppm av.cl.)
follow manufacturer’s instructions for dilution, application and contact times for all detergents and disinfectants

Any cloths and mop heads used must be disposed of as single use items

4.4 Cleaning and disinfection of reusable equipment

clean and disinfect any reusable non-invasive care equipment, such as blood pressure monitors, digital thermometers, glucometers, that are in the room prior to their removal
clean all reusable equipment systematically from the top or furthest away point

4.5 Carpeted flooring and soft furnishings

If carpeted floors or item cannot withstand chlorine-releasing agents, consult the manufacturer’s instructions for a suitable alternative to use, following or combined with detergent cleaning.

4.6 On leaving the room

discard detergent or disinfectant solutions safely at disposal point
all waste from suspected contaminated areas should be removed from the room and quarantined until patient test results are known (this may take 48 hours); if the patient is confirmed to have COVID-19 further advice should be sought from the local HPT

Clean, dry and store re-usable parts of cleaning equipment, such as mop handles remove and discard PPE as clinical waste perform hand hygiene

4.7 Cleaning of communal areas

If a suspected case spent time in a communal area, for example, a waiting area or toilet facilities, then these areas should be cleaned with detergent and disinfectant (as above) as soon as practicably possible, unless there has been a blood or body fluid spill which should be dealt with immediately. Once cleaning and disinfection have been completed, the area can be put back in use.

You can download the full pdf here for primary care optical practices

 


 
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